CPSC Finds No Product Link to Alleged Diaper Injuries

The Consumer Product Safety Commission, aided by Health Canada, has not been able to identify any link between new technology diapers and reports of alleged diaper rash-like injuries in users. CPSC says it looked into nearly 4,700 reports of diaper rash from April to August, 2010, but cannot identify a "scientific connection.”

Readers may recall that we posted about plaintiffs who have sued the Procter & Gamble Co. in a proposed national class action, alleging that new Pampers diapers containing “Dry Max” technology is causing rashes and "chemical burns" in some infants. See Clark, et al. v. Procter & Gamble Co., No. 10-301 (S.D. Ohio, 5/11/10).  What was most interesting for our readers, perhaps, is the fact that this litigation was apparently spurred by the social networking site, Facebook, where some parents have been blaming the new diapers for rashes. This has spread not only word of the incidence of a possible problem, but also the non-scientific, non-expert attribution of causation.

The CPSC said the on-line activism was part of what prompted them to try to get to the bottom of the alleged diaper issues. But it now has reported that the review has not identified any specific cause linking Dry Max diapers to diaper rash. CPSC notes that nearly 85 percent of the complaints came in May and then dropped off significantly -- which, MassTortDefense notes,  wouldn't make sense if the diapers actually were causing problems.

As part of its technical evaluation, staff from each agency considered certain characteristics of the diaper, including the materials used, the construction of the diaper, and heat and moisture retention issues.  In addition, CPSC staff reviewed clinical and toxicological data found in published, peer-reviewed medical literature. CPSC also critically reviewed data submitted by Procter & Gamble and the results of a human cumulative irritation patch study conducted by P&G in May 2010. Further, chemistry, toxicology and pediatric medicine information provided by Health Canada was reviewed by CPSC.

Both agencies say they will continue to evaluate consumer complaints related to Pampers Dry Max diapers and will provide parents with updated information if this assessment of no link somehow changes. Parents and caregivers were advised to seek the attention of a medical professional if they have any concerns about adverse health reactions to any baby product.  But most babies exhibit diaper rash at least once in their lifetime. At any given moment, more than 250,000 babies will experience a serious rash.  Diaper rash is not only very common, it is sometimes severe, regardless of the diaper used. Disposable diapers in fact have helped reduce the incidence of rash by more than 50 percent since they were first introduced in the 1960s because they pull wetness away from a baby's skin.