House Holds Hearing on Proposed Toxic Chemicals Safety Act

The Subcommittee on Commerce, Trade, and Consumer Protection  of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce held a hearing on H.R. 5820, the “Toxic Chemicals Safety Act of 2010,” last week.  The proposed legislation would amend the Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976 to deal with potential risks resulting from chemical exposure.

Witnesses included Steve Owens from the EPA; Calvin M. Dooley, President and Chief Executive Officer of the  American Chemistry Council; and Beth Bosley, Society of Chemical Manufacturers and Affiliates, Inc.

Any approach toward updating federal chemical regulation should balance safety issues with the need to preserve the ability of the United States to serve as the innovation engine for the world; and protect the hundreds of thousands of American jobs fueled directly and indirectly by the business of chemistry.  That is, reforming TSCA to enhance the safety assessment of chemicals while maintaining the ability of the U.S. chemical industry to be the international leader in innovation and manufacturing.

It is clear that the standards established in this bill sets an impossibly high hurdle for all chemicals in commerce, and are guaranteed to produce significant technical, bureaucratic and commercial barriers. For example, the bill requires that “aggregate exposure” to a chemical or a mixture meet the “reasonable certainty of no harm” standard. This apparently means that when a chemical or mixture is listed for a safety determination, the manufacturer carries the burden of showing with reasonable certainty not just that the company’s use of the chemical and any resulting exposures from those uses pose no significant risk of harm, but that all other aggregated exposures from all other uses of the chemical pose no harm. It is not clear to MassTortDefense how any company could actually do that in the real world.  TSCA regulates thousands of chemicals, many with hundreds of uses. TSCA chemicals have multiple important industrial applications and consumer product applications. It is totally unclear how industry or even the EPA would be able to gather enough information to meet this aggregate exposure standard for each and every regulated substance.

The proposed bill thus creates a burden that seems far out of proportion to its benefit. The onslaught of new regulations may simply force customers of the industry to relocate their factories and make the products at issue overseas, outside the EPA's jurisdiction.  The bill would also  discourage the introduction of new chemicals, including new greener chemicals, into commerce in the United States.  Congress, keep working at it.