California Publishes New Draft of Informal Green Chemistry Regulations

Yesterday the California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) convened a Green Ribbon Science Panel (GRSP) to continue work on the state's Green Chemistry initiative.

Readers may recall from previous posts that the GRSP was established with the passage of two "green chemistry laws" in 2008, and is charged with providing advice and serving as a resource to DTSC and the public regarding the California Green Chemistry Initiative. On the agenda for the meeting this week was input from the GRSP on the recently-posted “Safer Consumer Products Informal Draft Regulations”, which were published late last month.  An earlier draft of those regulations, released by the DTSC last November, drew strong commentary from both industry and environmental groups. According to DTSC, a wide range of stakeholders, including those from industry, environmental groups, scientists, and legislative leaders, raised "substantive and valid concerns" about the prior draft of the regulations. DTSC  eventually withdrew the draft regulations.

The latest draft regulations provide for a four-step process to identify safer consumer product alternatives: 1) create an immediate list of Chemicals of Concern (~3,000) based on the work already done by other organizations, and specify a process for DTSC to identify additional  chemicals as Chemicals of Concern (COCs); 2) require DTSC to evaluate and prioritize product/COC combinations to develop a list of “Priority Products” for which an alternatives assessment must be conducted; 3) require responsible entities (manufacturers, importers, and retailers) to notify DTSC when their product is listed as a Priority Product.  Manufacturers (or other responsible entities) must perform an "alternatives assessment" for the product and the Chemicals of Concern in the product to determine how best to limit potential exposures to, or the level of potential adverse public health and environmental impacts posed by, the Chemicals of Concern in the product; 4) require DTSC to identify and impose regulatory responses to effectively limit potential adverse public health and/or environmental impacts, if any, posed by the Priority Product/Chemical of Concern.

The draft regulations note that they would not apply to prescription drugs and devices; dental restorative materials; medical devices, and some other categories. But it is clear that they will impose significant new burdens on many product manufacturers, importers and sellers. The new regulations require risk assessments and life cycle analyses for prioritized products, which may lead to use limits for chemicals, reformulation requirements to eliminate targeted chemicals, or even a ban on sales of certain products in California.

And, of course, varying state regulations (in approach and content) frustrate the ability of those companies to design and market products in a global supply chain.

DTSC labels the new draft "informal," perhaps because they make substantial changes to the withdrawn set, which drew such intense scrutiny.   The initial list of “Chemicals of Concern” would be far broader than previously expected; the product prioritization criteria is revised, although it still appears likely to impact children's products, personal health, and other consumer products. But worker exposure has been added to the priority criteria as well. The regulations would also expand the list of hazards to include a wider range of hazard traits and environmental and toxicological testing endpoints. The previous exemption for unintentionally added chemicals would be eliminated, and, significantly, the “no exposure pathway” exemption would also be dropped.  

The regulations would require an alternatives assessment, conducted in two stages, with a report to DTSC regarding each stage. The first stage focuses on product criteria (function, performance, technical, and legal requirements), identification of alternatives to the COC, and screening of the alternatives.  The second stage would involve a detailed assessment of alternatives, focusing on exposure pathways and life cycle segments.

After evaluating the reports of the alternatives assessment, DTSC would then consider the appropriate regulatory response, which could involve a requirement of information disclosure, or more assessment, or limitation of certain uses, up to a ban.

The draft regulations would also require responsible entities to establish and pay for an end-of-life product stewardship program for any product that is to treated as a hazardous waste in California.

Materials for the meeting are here and here. On December 5, 2011, DTSC will hold a workshop on the informal draft regulations. The informal public comment period ends December 30, 2011.  DTSC apparently will then develop a formal new set of proposed regulations.   

Plaintiffs Attacking Fiji's Green Water Sing the Blues

A California appeals court last week affirmed the dismissal of a putative class action in which plaintiffs accused Fiji Water Co. LLC of improperly promoting its bottled water. Ayana Hill v. Roll International Corp. et al., No. A128698 (Cal. Ct. Appeal, 1st Appellate District).

Plaintiff  Hill alleged she bought bottles of Fiji water, on the label of which was a green drop; she claimed that the drop somehow represented Fiji bottled water was environmentally superior to other waters and endorsed by an environmental organization. Hill filed a proposed class action on behalf of herself and other consumers of Fiji bottled water, asserting violations of California‚Äüs Unfair Competition Law (UCL) (Bus. & Prof. Code, § 17200 et seq.), False Advertising Law (FAL) (§ 17500 et seq.), and Consumers Legal Remedies Act (CLRA) (Civ. Code, § 1750 et seq.), plus common law fraud and unjust enrichment.

Readers know that the term “green” is commonly used to describe the environmentally friendly aspects of products, and that concerned about over-use of such terms, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has issued standards known as “Green Guides” to describe the appropriate use of such labeling. The Federal Trade Commission last Fall proposed revisions to the guidance that it gives marketers to help them avoid making misleading environmental claims. The proposed changes were designed to update the Guides and make them easier for companies to understand and use.  The changes to the Green Guides included new guidance on marketers’ use of product certifications and seals of approval, “renewable energy” claims, “renewable materials” claims, and “carbon offset” claims.

Because the guides are not legislative rules under Section 18 of the FTC Act, they are not themselves enforceable regulations, nor do they have the force and effect of law. They consist of general principles, followed by nonexclusive specific examples, and are intended to provide a safe harbor for marketers who want certainty about how to make environmental claims. However, a few states, such as California, have incorporated the FTC guides into their consumer fraud (here CLRA) definition of environmental marketing claims.  

Hill's personal allegations were that, starting in 2008, she bought Fiji water about twice a week from Walgreens stores in San Francisco, relying on  these alleged representations that the product was “environmentally friendly and superior.” She would not have bought Fiji water had she supposedly known the truth that the Green Drop was the creation of defendants, not a neutral party or environmental group. Defendants accomplish this supposed elaborate "deception” through conspicuous placement of the Green Drop on the front of the product to allegedly look similar to environmental seals of approval.  Further, plaintiff complained  that in their packaging and marketing, defendants have “called their product FijiGreen” and, in stores and other public places, stated that "Every Drop is Green.” 

The trial court dismissed the claims, and plaintiff appealed.  In that posture, the court assumed that Hill actually was, as she claims, misled in the context to believe that the green drop symbol on Fiji water was a seal implicitly indicating approval by a third party organization, and thus believed that the Fiji product was environmentally superior to competitors' bottled water.

The problem was that Hill's beliefs, asserted and even assumed, do not satisfy the reasonable consumer standard, as expressed in the FTC guides (16 C.F.R. § 260.7(a) (2011) [material implied claims conveyed “to reasonable consumers”]) and as used in California's consumer laws. The court of appeals emphasized that the standard is not a least sophisticated consumer, nor the unwary consumer , but the ordinary consumer within the larger population.  Importantly, the court noted that "it follows, in these days of inevitable and readily available Internet criticism and suspicion of virtually any corporate enterprise, that a reasonable consumer also does not include one who is overly suspicious."  How true that is.

So, does the green drop on Fiji water bottles convey to a reasonable consumer in the circumstances that the product is endorsed for environmental superiority by a third party organization? No, said the court. The drop itself bears no name or recognized logo of any group, much less a third party organization, no trademark symbol, and no other indication that it is anything but a symbol of Fiji water.  The water has just a green drop, the drop being the most logical icon for this particular product—water.  And for context, a green drop on the back of every bottle appears right next to the website name, “fijigreen.com,” further confirming to a reasonable consumer that the green drop symbol is by Fiji water, not an independent third party organization—and, of course, inviting consumers to visit the website, where Fiji Water's explains its  environmental efforts.

Plaintiff asked the court of appeals to reverse the the trial court's denial of leave to amend, claiming that any defects in the complaint could be cured by amendment. But Hill's saying so "does not make it so," and it was her burden to show how she might amend to cure the deficiencies. She did not. Dismissal without leave affirmed.


 

Multi-State Coalition On Chemicals Management Formed

Readers have been following our posts on new state efforts on chemical regulation, such  as California's Green Chemistry initiative. Now comes word that environmental officials from 10 state and local governments have formed an umbrella organization - the Interstate Chemicals Clearinghouse (IC2) - with the stated goals of promoting a clean environment, healthy communities, and a vital economy through the development and use of safer chemicals and products.

The states joining IC2 include California, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, and Washington.

The goals of the IC2 are to:

  • Avoid duplication and enhance efficiency and effectiveness of state, local, and tribal initiatives on chemicals through collaboration and coordination
  • Build agency capacity to identify and promote safer chemicals and products
  • Ensure that state, local, and tribal agencies, businesses, and the public have ready access to high quality and authoritative chemicals data, information, and assessment methods

Launched under the auspices of the Northeast Waste Management Officials' Association (NEWMOA), the new Clearinghouse says it will support state, local, and tribal health and environmental agencies with development and implementation of programs to promote use of safer chemicals and products; support the development of alternative assessment methods and identification of safer alternatives; share data and information on chemical use, hazard, exposure, and alternatives; share strategies and outcomes on chemicals prioritization initiatives; and build the capacity of agencies by sharing materials, strategies, and trainings.  IC2 has a number of projects planned in these areas.

The Northeast Waste Management Officials Association's announcement of the IC2 comes just as many chemical manufacturers are expecting that the federal government (including through an update to TSCA) will take the lead in regulating chemical products, not state regulatory agencies and legislatures.

Industry groups, including the American Chemistry Council, continue to believe that a patchwork of state and local programs has the potential to create more confusion for consumers and manufacturers, and may ultimately simply hamper investment, and threaten future job creation.  As we have noted, some of the bills introduced in the last Congress would have set an impossibly high hurdle for all chemicals in commerce, and were guaranteed to produce significant technical, bureaucratic and commercial barriers. Of particular concern to readers of MassTortDefense would be efforts to eliminate the current risk-based review system under TSCA and force EPA to use the so-called precautionary principle.

It seems more supportable that any overhaul of TSCA should include the notion that scientific reviews must use data and methods based on the best available science and risk-based assessment; must include cost-benefit considerations for the private-sector and consumers; must protect proprietary business information, and should logically prioritize reviews for existing chemicals.



 

California Postpones Green Chemistry Regulations

California has postponed final adoption of its green chemistry rules pending further review to address a variety of stakeholder concerns. As readers know from previous posts, "green chemistry" is the state's effort to require that chemical products be designed in such a way as to reduce the use or generation of hazardous substances and reduce health and environmental risks, with a clear emphasis on finding alternatives to "chemicals of concern."

Two bills passed in 2008 by the legislature mandated that DTSC develop regulations for identifying and prioritizing chemicals of concern, to create methods for analyzing alternatives to existing chemicals, and to create a mechanism for regulatory response, including possible restrictions or bans on certain chemicals. The laws also created a Green Ribbon Science Panel to advise DTSC, and provided for a Chemical Information Clearinghouse that will make chemical risk information more accessible to the public.

Now, the state environmental head, Secretary Linda Adams, has announced that the California Department of Toxic Substances Control will reconvene the Green Ribbon Science Panel to take another look at the proposed regulations. Those regulations, released by the DTSC last November, drew strong commentary  from both industry and environmental groups.  According to Adams, a wide range of stakeholders, including those from industry, environmental groups, scientists, and legislative leaders, have raised "substantive and valid concerns" about the most recent draft of the regulations. 

 


 

Inside Counsel Explores California Green Chemistry Regs

Your humble blogger is quoted in the latest edition of the fine publication INSIDE COUNSEL.  See “Proposed Regulation Requires Companies To Go Green,” Inside Counsel, November 1, 2010.

Readers know we have posted on California's Green Chemistry program.  This new article explores its potential impact, which will likely reverberate far beyond that state’s borders.  for example, I spoke to the publication about the impracticality of making two versions of many products, one for California and one for the rest of the nation. 

The article also suggests that plaintiffs attorneys will likely find plenty of litigation opportunities in the initiative, including the argument that changes made to comply with the regulation could and should have been made earlier, as I discussed with the author.

I also pointed out that there doesn’t appear to be an easy mechanism for getting a chemical or product off the state's target list once it’s finalized, highlighting the importance of the initial comment period.

 

DTSC Green Chemistry Symposium

The California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) and the state's Department of Public Health (DPH) are hosting a brown-bag symposium, "Green Chemistry through the Lens of Public Health," next week.  The program will examine the potential and intended effects of Green Chemistry on public health. It is set for Monday, October 18, 2010, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.
 

We have posted on the California Green Chemistry Initiative, from the introduction of legislation for the program, to the proposal of draft regulations, to the final rule making stages.  As readers know from previous posts, "green chemistry" is the state's effort to require that chemical products be designed in such a way as to reduce the use or generation of hazardous substances and reduce health and environmental risks, with a clear emphasis on finding alternatives to "chemicals of concern."  Two bills passed in 2008 by the legislature mandated that DTSC develop regulations for identifying and prioritizing chemicals of concern, to create methods for analyzing alternatives to existing chemicals, and to create a mechanism for regulatory response, including possible restrictions or bans on certain chemicals. The laws also created a Green Ribbon Science Panel to advise DTSC, and provided for a Chemical Information Clearinghouse that will make chemical risk information more accessible to the public.

The symposium is scheduled to feature interactive discussions with physicians, scientists and some stakeholders on the impact of the new chemicals policy on public health. The keynote speakers are Dr. Margaret Kripke, Ph.D., immunologist, and Steve Owens from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention.

The event is open to the public and is supposed to be accessible via a live webcast at www.dtsc.ca.gov/greenchemistry.
 

 

California's Proposed "Green Chemistry" Regulations Move Forward

California's proposed "green chemistry" regulation took another step closer to completion last week, as the state Department of Toxic Substance Control (DTSC) submitted the draft regulations to begin the final official rulemaking process.  The public has until Nov. 1, 2010 to make comments.  Under state law passed in 2008, the regulations must be finalized before 2011.

As readers know from previous posts, "green chemistry" is the state's effort to require that chemical products be designed in such a way as to reduce the use or generation of hazardous substances and reduce health and environmental risks, with a clear emphasis on finding alternatives to "chemicals of concern."  Two bills passed in 2008 by the legislature mandated that DTSC develop regulations for identifying and prioritizing chemicals of concern, to create methods for analyzing alternatives to existing chemicals, and to create a mechanism for regulatory response, including possible restrictions or bans on certain chemicals.  The laws also created a Green Ribbon Science Panel to advise DTSC, and provided for a Chemical Information Clearinghouse that will make chemical risk information more accessible to the public.

Earlier in 2010, the agency released a draft Safer Consumer Product Alternatives regulation, then held public meetings and workshops and took written comments.  Last week, the final, slightly revised draft, was issued. DTSC’s regulations call for identifying and prioritizing chemicals in consumer products, for conducting an alternatives assessment, and then an appropriate  regulatory response.

The proposed regulations call for creation of a proposed initial list of Chemicals under Consideration by June 1, 2012, and, from that an eventual list of Priority Chemicals by July 1, 2012. Similarly, the agency is to create a proposed initial list of Products under Consideration (because they contain the relevant chemicals) by March 1, 2013, and eventually a final list of Priority Products by December 1, 2013. In making this determination, the regulations offer a long list of relevant factors, including usage, distribution, disposal and life cycle issues, use by sensitive sub-populations, and a host of toxicity parameters.  One thing for manufacturers to watch: it is unclear how the DTSC will weigh and balance these and other factors. Especially important will be the relative emphasis on realistic, feasible exposure scenarios and dose, as opposed to theoretical risks in the lab.  A second area of potential concern here is that while the proposed regulations include a fairly detailed (and likely lengthy) petition process to challenge regulatory response decisions, they apparently do not include a similar ready process to seek removal of a chemical or product from the priority lists.  Thus, manufacturers and relevant trade associations will have to closely monitor the draft/proposed lists and jump into the comment period before the lists are finalized. Food, drugs, and a few other products are exempt, but the potential list of "consumer products" is quite large.

In the second phase involving Alternative Assessments, product makers will have to provide what may become a quite complex and expensive assessment of potential alternatives to the chemical/product, including a look at hazards, potential exposures, and life cycle.  For example, if the lead of the assessment team works for the manufacturer, the Assessment must be reviewed and verified by an independent third-party consultant.  It is unclear what data DTSC will want to see here, including whether the agency will require additional, new toxicity testing of a product or an alternative.  This may be especially onerous for smaller companies, and for newer technologies (think nano?) in which the existing body of data may not be as robust. One area for companies to watch here is the protection, or lack thereof, of trade secret information.  Ingredients in a product, and possible alternatives that make the product safer, are often a key part of intellectual property, a competitive advantage.  The regulations purport to offer some trade secret protection, but it s not crystal clear how the DTSC will apply this principle.

After receiving the Alternative Assessment, the DTSC is to decide on the best method, if any, to mitigate paternal risks with the product, ranging from no further action to recalls and bans.

The regulations offer a good reminder to double-check company knowledge and comfort with the supply chain, components and agreements, risk sharing provisions, insurance coverage, etc.

California Takes Next Steps On "Green Chemistry"

Readers know how California's often extreme statutory and regulatory initiatives can influence toxic tort litigation.  Now comes word that California regulators last week released a proposed framework for forthcoming regulations to reduce certain chemicals in consumer products, as part of its “green chemistry” initiative.

The California Department of Toxic Substances Control’s release of an outline of the Draft Regulations for Safer Products is a second step in identifying "chemicals of concern" in California. The outline proposes guidelines for scientific and systematic prioritization of chemicals and products of concern, certification of alternatives assessment and development of DTSC’s regulatory response. Those responses may include banning substances or products, and end-of-life management issues. It also described a process manufacturers could use to evaluate the chemicals and safer have to perform an "Alternatives Assessment" for the product. Note that any public or private entity or individual may petition the Department to evaluate a chemical or a chemical and product combination during the prioritization process.

DTSC called for feedback on the outline.  The next step will be creating actual draft regulations based on the outline. The agency said that draft regulations will be released in the very near future, and that it will begin a formal rule-making process. State law requires the regulations be adopted by January 1, 2011.

California's green chemistry initiative, a statutory mandate since 2008, is an effort to identify and to reduce the use of chemicals that regulators conclude pose the greatest risk to public health and the environment. 

 

Safe Chemicals Bill Introduced in Senate

Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg, D-N.J., chair of the Senate Subcommittee on Superfund, Toxics
and Environmental Health, introduced this week the "Safe Chemicals Act of 2010," which would
amend the the Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976.

Over the last several months, Congress has held a series of hearings focusing on chemical safety and possible ways to modernize TSCA. Chemical business leaders, public officials, scientists, doctors, academics, and liberal environmental organizations have expressed support for varied methods of reforms to the principal toxic substance law. The “Safe Chemicals Act of 2010” comports with the reform principles laid out by the Obama Administration and groups such as the Safer Chemicals Healthy Families Coalition, and purports to address issues with TSCA identified by the GAO.

The bill (summarized here) is supposed to:

  • provide EPA with sufficient information to judge a chemical’s safety, by requiring manufacturers to develop and submit a minimum data set for each chemical they produce, while also preventing duplicative or unnecessary testing. EPA will have full authority to request additional information needed to determine the safety of a chemical.
  • Prioritize chemicals by having EPA categorize chemicals based on risk, and focus resources on evaluating those most likely to cause harm.
  • Place a new burden of proof on chemical manufacturers to prove the safety of their chemicals, including all foreseeable uses, before the chemical may enter the market or continue to be used.
  • Create more access to chemical information, by establishing a public database to catalog the information submitted by chemical manufacturers and the EPA’s safety determinations. The EPA will impose requirements to ensure the information collected is "reliable."
  • Promote innovation and development of green chemistry, through grant programs and research centers to foster the development of safe chemical alternatives, and bring some new chemicals onto the market using an expedited review process.


     

It is clear that safety must be the primary goal of chemical regulatory reform, and the scientific and technological advances made since the passage of TSCA should allow industry and the regulatory agency to achieve a high degree of safety.  Certainly,  the need to prioritize chemicals for evaluation, a proper risk-based approach to EPA safety reviews, and a reduction in animal testing, are all aspects that should generate bi-partisan support. However, the bill’s proposed decision-making standard may be both legally and technically impossible to meet. Readers know how the articulation and application of the burden of proof can be outcome determinative. It is impossible to prove that something is "safe,” if one means risk-free. Every substance, even water, is hazardous to health at some levels in some exposure contexts. It would be devastating for our economy if this bill was merely a back-door attempt to make the so-called precautionary principle the law in this country, as it is in Europe. It is simply scientifically false that every chemical that is dangerous at high doses is also hazardous at low doses;  it is patently false that every chemical that causes effects in lab animals will also cause those effects in human beings.

And the proposed changes to the new chemicals program could very well hamper innovation in new products, processes, and technologies. In addition, the bill undermines business certainty by appearing to allow states to adopt their own regulations and create a lack of regulatory uniformity for chemicals and the products that use them.

Congressmen Henry Waxman and Robert Rush have proposed a "discussion draft" on the House side, and that may afford an opportunity for a transparent and meaningful discussion by all key stakeholder groups to ensure that TSCA reforms are based on sound science and protect the safety of all consumers, while promoting jobs and innovation.  In these uncertain economic times, the last thing needed is another expensive government program that risks doing more harm than good.