Digitek Class Action Denied in MDL

The federal judge in the multidistrict litigation concerning the heart drug Digitek has denied class certification in the MDL's six remaining class actions.  In re: Digitek Products Liability Litigation, MDL No. 1968 (S.D. W. Va.).

Quick history. Digitek® is a trade-name for a drug called digoxin. Digoxin was approved by the FDA to treat various heart problems. At some point, a handful of non-conforming dose tablets were found in a lot of 4.8 million tablets.  Defendant initiated a voluntary Class I nationwide product recall.  A flood of civil actions were instituted in state and federal courts across the country. The plaintiffs claimed a variety of injuries and losses resulting from the recalled Digitek®. In 2008, the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation established an MDL proceeding.

The MDL court addressed several overlapping motions for class certification. The class representatives each sought some kind of economic loss class certified pursuant to Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 23. Two of the class complaints sought only a single-state class. Others sought a nationwide class of all persons residing in the United States who purchased Digitek® pursuant to prescription, during the time period when the recalled Digitek® was manufactured, or sold, who suffered economic losses, including, but not limited to, payments for recalled Digitek®, out-of-pocket expenses for diagnostic testing, medical visits, and/or new prescriptions, as a result of having received recalled Digitek®.

Generally, the plaintiffs focused not on the distinct and highly individualized alleged injuries to the class, but -- as is typical -- on defendants’ alleged misconduct that led to the recall.  In doing so, the plaintiffs tried to paint New Jersey as the nerve center for certification purposes. In fact, they said New Jersey law should control all of the potentially hundreds of thousands of class members’ claims and recoveries throughout the United States. They thus downplayed the individual issues that would arise, including choice of law. They stressed instead that the damages  allegedly suffered by each individual class member were modest and, absent a certified class, millions of consumers would be left without remedy.

The court first addressed the choice of law issues in a nationwide class, as the state in which each claimant was injured has an overriding interest in having its laws applied to redress any wrong done to its citizens.  For example, state consumer protection laws vary considerably, and courts must respect these differences rather than just apply one state's law to sales in other states with different rules.  In re St. Jude Medical, Inc., 425 F.3d 1116, 1120 (8th Cir. 2005).  See generally Kanner, Consumer Class Actions After CAFA, 56 Drake L. Rev. 303, 334 (2008).  Unjust enrichment law varies considerably throughout the United States as well.  Tyler v. Alltel Corp., 265 F.R.D. 415, 422 (E.D. Ark. 2010).  The court reached the same conclusion with the express and implied warranty claims.  See, e.g., Walsh v. Ford Motor Co., 807 F.2d 1000, 1016-17 (D.C. Cir.1986).  The differences impact the class certification factors of typicality, predominance, and manageability.

Putting aside the choice of law issue (that is, assuming a class of New Jersey residents alone and applying only New Jersey law to their claims), the court found that common issues still did not predominate. Violation of the NJ Consumer Fraud Act is subject to proof of a number of
elements, including that plaintiff suffered an ascertainable loss as a result of the unlawful conduct; and a causal relationship between the unlawful practice and the loss sustained.  That is, the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act affords a right to monetary relief only if there has been an  ascertainable loss in consequence of the consumer receiving something other than what he bargained for, and losing the benefits of the product which he was led to believe he had purchased.  Plaintiffs' contention here that everyone in the class sustained an ascertainable loss presumes that the drug was worthless. But the drug was enormously beneficial to many patients; most got the right dose. Those patients presumably got their money's worth and suffered no economic injury. And the question whether an individual class member got his or her money's worth is inherently individual. Indeed, it involves very much the same questions as would a claim for money damages for personal injury.

This was seen in the differences between the class representatives: one returned Digitek® following the recall. But he received, in return, replacement digoxin at no charge. Another wanted a co-payment for a doctor visit that he had post-recall. He admitted, though, that the appointment was scheduled pre-recall. If certification were granted, this type of fact-intensive investigation and specific explanation would likely be necessary for all claimants to assure that their claims were compensation worthy.

The individual questions also proliferate to the extent the jury is ultimately required to determine which class members received defective Digitek® and which did not. In other words, it may ultimately be inappropriate, said the court, to treat all the recalled Digitek® as a single “defective” product for purposes of making the determination of whether it was unsafe.  Thus product identification would have individual, as opposed to collective, hallmarks.

Another individual issue was the vast array of individualized damages the representatives were seeking. The plaintiffs tried to sweep this concern aside. But even if not controlling,  individualized damage determinations cut against class certification under Rule 23(b)(3).  Ward v.
Dixie Nat. Life Ins. Co.
, 595 F.3d 164, 180 (4th Cir. 2010).

Finally, the court confronted the individualized process of sorting out those potential class members who were already fully compensated by the defendants' refund process. Mitigation was  another highly individualized matter.  Certification appropriately denied. 

Digitek MDL Update

Recent developments in the Digitek MDL.  The presiding judge in the federal Digitek multidistrict litigation has selected five bellwether cases to be tried.  Readers of MassTortDefense know that an increasingly common case management technique in consolidated or coordinated litigation is the use of bellwether trials, with the hope that early verdicts will impact the resolution of cases down the line.  Judge Goodwin issued Pretrial Order (PTO) No. 47, which assigned the following five cases for trial, in this order:

 • David Kelch, et al. v. Actavis Totowa, LLC, et al., 2:08-cv-01282

 • William J. Young, et al. v. Actavis Totowa, LLC, et al., 2:09-cv-00498

 • Jacquelyn K. Fox, et al. v. Actavis Totowa, LLC, et al., 2:09-cv-00389

 • Karen Sheahan, et al. v. Actavis Group, et al., 2:08-cv-01051

 • Scottie Vega, et al. v. Actavis Group hf., et al., 2:09-cv-00768

Readers may recall that the federal Digitek product liability cases, alleging that Actavis Totowa LLC, Actavis Inc. and Actavis Elizabeth LLC released Digitek tablets containing more than the appropriate dosage to the public in 2008, were transferred to an MDL  last August. The plaintiffs allege that the tablets can cause digitalis toxicity in patients with renal failure. This condition can cause nausea, vomiting, dizziness, low blood pressure, cardiac instability, bradycardia and death.

The MDL court also recently ordered the plaintiffs to file their class certification motion and brief in support of their "economic loss" class by Jan. 20, 2010.  Defendants’ response brief shall be filed and served thirty days after the filing of such class certification motion and accompanying brief, said the order.

The court also entered amended PTO #48 (Joint Hearing to Address Challenges to Scientific and Technical Evidence). In the spirit of cooperation and collegiality evident since the inception of this MDL, said the court, several distinguished state judicial officers presiding over certain consolidated Digitek actions have graciously agreed to conduct a joint hearing to address the scientific and technical issues presented in this litigation for resolution pursuant to Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 509 U.S. 579 (1993), and its federal and state progeny. Those issues are best addressed, said the MDL court,  through coordinated proceedings, albeit with each presiding judicial officer giving separate and individualized attention, and disposition, to the evidence and arguments as they relate to his or her assigned consolidated civil actions. The court recognized that each state may have its own standards and procedures for expert testimony designed to ensure the reliability and relevance of evidence based upon scientific, technical and other specialized knowledge.  That joint hearing is scheduled for October, 2010.

This is just the latest step in efforts for such coordination. Pretrial Order (PTO) No. 11 concerned state and federal coordination. It ordered lead and liaison counsel for the plaintiffs and defense to endeavor to coordinate activities between the federal and state litigation. It also ordered the creation of a joint document depository for use by parties in the federal-state litigation. The Order provided a mechanism for cross-noticing depositions. The next status conference is scheduled for Thursday, February 11, 2010 at 9:00 a.m.
 

 

 

Update on Digitek Litigation

In the Digitek MDL, the parties have been wrangling over the defense motion for a Lone Pine order. See generally Lore v. Lone Pine, No. L-336006-85, 1986 WL 637507 (N.J. Super. Ct. Nov. 18, 1986).

Dozens of product liability cases alleging that defendants Actavis Totowa LLC, Actavis Inc. and Actavis Elizabeth LLC marketed Digitek tablets containing double the appropriate dosage were transferred to an MDL assigned to Chief Judge Goodwin of the Southern District of West Virginia last summer. In Re: Digitek Products Liability Litigation, MDL No. 1968 (S.D. W.Va.).
 

Defendants recently moved for a Lone Pine order under which each plaintiff must submit an "affidavit from a medical expert in each case establishing that there is medical evidence of digoxin toxicity." Readers of MassTortDefense recognize this important and logical procedural tool for management of mass toxic tort litigation.  When the major factual battles will be over injury and causation, it may make sense to focus discovery on these issues, and prior to resorting to expensive and time-consuming discovery, to require plaintiffs to come forward with some prima facie showing of injury and specific causation, or as the court put it, "some evidence of certain elements of their claims, e.g. medical causation, to support a credible claim."

The plaintiffs in the federal Digitek multidistrict litigation filed a brief opposing the motion, arguing that the discovery in the MDL is still in its "incipient stages."  As they typically do, the plaintiffs argued that such orders "effectively function as untimely and unjust summary judgment devices and violate the discovery rules for expert witness disclosures and reports." They also argued that they have provided significant case-specific discovery in the form of Plaintiffs' Fact Sheets and records authorizations.

The court entered PTO #43 (Order re Request for Lone Pine Order), saying the motion is taken under advisement pending completion of basic fact discovery of Group 1 cases. Under the latest schedule, Plaintiff shall serve their reports from liability experts no later than March 15, 2010.  The parties shall complete their depositions of Plaintiffs’ liability experts no later than May 28, 2010.  Defendants shall serve their reports from liability experts no later than June 15, 2010. The parties shall complete their depositions of Defendants’ liability experts no later than August 31, 2010. 

At the November 20, 2009, conference each party is to present to the court their choice of five cases that they believe to be representative plaintiffs for trial in accordance with PTO #38, governing the creation of a trial pool upon completion of basic fact discovery, including but not limited to the depositions of plaintiffs, plaintiffs’ physicians who prescribed Digitek® to them, physicians who treated Plaintiffs for alleged digoxin toxicity, and pharmacists who filled plaintiffs’ prescriptions for Digitek®.
 

Digitek MDL Plaintiffs Ordered To Respond To Discovery

The federal court has ordered plaintiffs in the MDL concerning the heart medication Digitek to respond to discovery relating to whether the individuals in each identified case had sufficient evidentiary support to justify filing their claim.  The decision is also interesting for all those in mass torts struggling with plaintiffs' typically inadequate responses to initial fact discovery and Plaintiff Fact Sheets. In re: Digitek Products Liability Litigation, MDL-1968 (S.D. W.Va.).

In April, 2008, the FDA announced a recall of the drug Digitek® (Digoxin) distributed by Mylan Bertek Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and UDL Laboratories, Inc. The recall stated that certain lots of the tablets may have contained more than the approved level of the drug’s active ingredient, thereby exposing patients with renal failure who consumed the drug to the risk of digitalis toxicity. Soon thereafter, the plaintiffs filed civil actions against the defendants in state and federal courts across the country. In August, 2008, the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation entered an order establishing a multidistrict litigation proceeding, which consolidated federal Digitek® related actions for joint case management. The plaintiffs generally allege that the defendants manufactured, marketed, tested, promoted, and/or distributed Digitek® with inconsistent amounts of the active ingredient.

As is fairly typical, plaintiffs were required to fill out basic fact information about their use of the drug and alleged injuries in Plaintiff Fact Sheets.  Such fact sheets are often used instead of  interrogatories, and allow the parties and the court to assess the various types of cases in the mass tort. They can be crucial to decide on trial plan, the scope and timing of additional discovery, and even settlement analysis. 

Defendants served three requests for admission in 39 individual cases, seeking information relating to whether the plaintiff in each identified case had sufficient evidentiary support to justify filing a claim. The requests at issue asked the plaintiff or their counsel  to "admit that you did not serve Defendants with any of Plaintiff’s medical records when you served the Plaintiff Fact Sheet;"  to "admit that you did not have any of Plaintiff’s medical records or pharmacy records in your possession when you filed the Complaint in this case;" and to "admit that you did not have Plaintiff’s medical records or pharmacy records in your possession when you served Defendants with the Plaintiff Fact Sheet."

The Plaintiffs’ Steering Committee in the MDL submitted the plaintiffs’ master objections to the defendants’ requests. They argued that the discovery was premature: before the parties may begin
discovery on an individual case, that case must be selected for inclusion in a trial group. Second, they allege that the defendants are attempting to cure deficient Plaintiff Fact Sheets with the
requests, rather than through the deficiency process outlined in previous pre-trial orders.  Third, in a preemptive strike, they argued that since the Plaintiff Fact Sheets constitute discovery responses,  defendants cannot pursue sanctions for them under Rule 11.  Finally, plaintiffs also asserted that the requests were not reasonably calculated to lead to the discovery of admissible evidence, and alleged that the targeted information is protected by the attorney-client privilege and/or the work product doctrine.

The court noted that the defendants have expressed serious concerns about the merits of many of the cases filed in the MDL. They believe that a large number of cases lack sufficient evidentiary support demonstrating that the identified plaintiffs exhibited digitalis toxicity as a result of ingesting nonconforming Digitek® tablets. The defendants are attempting to determine whether the plaintiffs served with the requests possessed their medical and pharmacy records at the time their complaints were filed and the Plaintiff Fact Sheets were submitted. The defendants suspect they were not. If their suspicions prove true, the answers to the requests may be used to support future Rule 11 motions for sanctions.

The court first held that the provisions and stipulations contained in previously entered pretrial orders do not prohibit the defendants from serving requests for admission on individual plaintiffs at this time.

Next, regarding the deficiency process, the court noted that the defendants were not seeking information that must be contained in a Plaintiff Fact Sheet. Rather, they are seeking Rule 11 information relating to whether the plaintiffs had a sufficient evidentiary basis to file suit. The requests specifically target information concerning whether the plaintiffs possessed their medical and pharmacy records at particular times. This information is outside the scope required to be disclosed in a Plaintiff Fact Sheet. The deficiency process described in pretrial orders has no application in determining whether the defendants’ requests for admission are proper.

Third, while the plaintiffs are correct that Plaintiff Fact Sheets are considered discovery responses according to the case management order, their argument about Rule 11 is premature because the defendants have not yet filed a Rule 11 motion for sanctions. Even so, the plaintiffs again missed the point of the defendants’ requests. The defendants were not attempting to discover whether the plaintiffs committed sanctionable conduct in their Plaintiff Fact Sheets. Instead, they were trying to gather information as to whether there were appropriate Rule 11 prefiling investigations.

Also, the court found that the requests were specifically aimed at discovering information relevant
to the defendants’ defense. If the plaintiffs in the 39 cases in fact failed to comply with Rule 11, serious issues arise as to the merits of those plaintiffs’ claims. The defendants would
be able to use the information gathered from the requests to support a defense that the claims lack
evidentiary basis. Thus, the information sought by the defendants is within the scope of discoverable material under Rule 26(b)(1).

Finally, the court acknowledged that information relating to Rule 11 may raise potential privilege
and conflict issues. However, if the information received by an attorney from a client is relevant to
whether a complaint is well-founded, it probably will eventually be disclosed, either in a pleading
or in later discovery. Schwarzer, Sanctions Under the New Federal Rule 11--A Closer Look, 104
F.R.D. 181, 199 (1985). Thus, the fact that information may be incorporated into work product does
not immunize it from disclosure.

In summary, based upon the allegations contained in the complaints, a prefiling investigation without first obtaining medical and pharmacy records would be reasonable only in an extremely
limited set of circumstances. The records would be essential in determining whether the plaintiffs
have a colorable claim. Rule 11 applies to the same extent in mass tort and multidistrict litigation as it does in more conventional disputes.The defendants’ requests for admission were sufficiently and narrowly tailored to reveal whether the plaintiffs were in possession of the relevant records at the time suit was initiated. The requests would not cause the plaintiffs any undue burden or hardship as the information necessary to answer the requests should be readily ascertainable. 

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Latest Update on Digitek MDL

The Digitek MDL Judge, on March 5th,  entered PTO # 16, which details important case management and scheduling deadlines in this mass tort. 

For those interested in some of the nuts and bolts of managing an MDL: the Order  requires that within 45 days, each defendant named in the Master Complaint shall file a Master Answer or a Fed. R. Civ. P. 12 motion in response to the Master Complaint.

The Order sets deadline for plaintiffs to request and brief class certification of any wrongful death, personal injury or medical monitoring putative class in September, 2009.

Plaintiffs are required to fill out and sign Plaintiff Fact Sheets, providing basic fact discovery.  It sets up a process for handling deficiencies in the responses.

Plaintiffs are to provide signed undated authorizations for the gathering of medical records, and addresses for each health care provider, including hospitals, clinics and outpatient treatment centers, and any other custodian of records identified in a plaintiff’s Fact Sheet.

Plaintiffs are ordered to produce medical and pharmacy records in their  possession establishing that the plaintiff was prescribed Digitek and the date(s) on which each prescription issued.

The Order set up a procedure for governing the oft-debated ex parte contact by defendants of treating physicians.

Defendants are ordered to provide organizational chart information as well as QC/QA structures. Also specifications, instructions, test methods and standard operating procedures relating to the manufacture of  Digitek;  quality assurance/control and testing records for Digitek, and any of its component ingredients, including but not limited to records related to batch sampling, post-manufacturing testing and finished goods testing. 

The Order establishes a procedure for privilege logs. The parties were directed to reach an agreement concerning a document production protocol to include the production format of paper and electronic documents, objective coding and metadata, privilege logs and any other applicable issues. In the event the parties cannot agree, the issues will be presented to Magistrate Judge Stanley for resolution.

The PTO also sets deadlines for service of interrogatories, document requests, and company witness depositions. As to expert discovery: Plaintiffs shall serve their reports from liability experts no later than January 1, 2010. The parties shall complete their depositions of Plaintiffs’ liability  experts no later than March 12, 2010.  Defendants shall serve their reports from liability experts no later than March 31, 2010.  The parties shall complete their depositions of Defendants’ liability experts no later than June 11, 2010.

To efficiently manage discovery for all currently pending and future cases in the MDL, the cases will be divided into groups, with each group having a separate scheduling order. Following completion of the first wave of Plaintiffs’ Fact Sheets the Court shall schedule a hearing for purposes of  selecting the initial trial pool of cases (“Group 1”). No later than 5 days before the hearing, Plaintiffs shall select 15 cases and the Defendants shall select 15 cases, and each side shall exchange lists of such selections and submit them to the Court.  Within 10 days after the scheduled hearing, the Court shall select a total of no more than twenty of the proposed trial pool cases to constitute Group 1.

Case specific discovery is set up by Group, with staggered dates of initial discovery (DID),  corresponding discovery deadlines, and Daubert and dispositive motions deadlines 310 days after  DID.

Digitek MDL Court Issues Federal-State Coordination Order

An important aspect of mass tort case management involves the level of coordination between cases in a federal MDL and those cases in state courts involving the same product. The MDL judge in the Digitek products liability multidistrict litigation, In Re: Digitek Products Liability Litigation, MDL No. 1968, No. 08-md-1968( S.D. W.Va.), issued an order coordinating activities between the federal litigation and the mass tort litigation recently coordinated before the state court in West Virginia's Circuit Court. In Re: Digitek Litigation, No. 08-C-5555, (W.Va. Cir., Kanahwa Co.).

Readers of MassTortDefense will recall the nationwide recall of Digitek products, involving tablets with higher dosage than called for which may have been released to the public. Approximately 60 cases arising from the recall were transferred last August to a multidistrict litigation assigned to Chief U.S. Judge Joseph R. Goodwin of the Southern District of West Virginia. Later in the Fall, multiple Digitek stats court cases were coordinated in the Kanawha County Circuit Court.


Pretrial Order (PTO) No. 11 concerns state and federal coordination. The court found that the state and federal litigation share common issues and will involve common discovery.  The court said proper coordination will avoid unnecessary conflicts and expense, conserve judicial resources, and expedite the disposition of all the cases. 

He ordered lead and liaison counsel for the plaintiffs and defense to endeavor to coordinate activities between the federal and state litigation. He also ordered the creation of a joint document depository for use by parties in the federal-state litigation. The Order provides a mechanism for cross-noticing depositions.  Also, counsel in the West Virginia state litigation who obtain confidential documents are subject to the confidentiality/protective order issued in the MDL.


Chief Judge Goodwin also said he is prepared to conduct "consolidated hearings and status conferences with the presiding state judicial officers, and to enter joint rulings, except to the extent that differences may be mandated by different laws or rules governing this court or justified by particular circumstances of the cases before this court." 

Update on Digitek Litigation

As posted by MassTortDefense, the Digitek MDL judge late in 2008 issued a pretrial order regarding multi-plaintiff complaints. In Pretrial Order No. 7, the court ordered the severance of most multi-plaintiff cases (other than spouses). In Re: Digitek Products Liability Litigation, MDL No. 1968 (S.D. W.Va.). The court noted that several complaints in this MDL action join multiple plaintiffs whose only apparent connection with one another is that they allegedly ingested the drug at issue. Other MDL judges have noted the case management, tracking, and other difficulties often accompanying that joinder practice, citing Vioxx and diet drugs.

Plaintiffs’ Co-Lead Counsel were to submit to the court a report identifying multi-plaintiff actions docketed prior to this Order that are subject to severance, and submit a suitable proposed severance order. One of the reasons plaintiffs resist such severance is the need to pay separate filing fees for all the separate claims filed, but the Order required the fees.


The plaintiffs in the Digitek multidistrict litigation then identified five class actions that they say meet the court's requirements for severance under Pretrial Order No. 7. The plaintiffs said that the five cases they identified have multiple class representatives, but  -- despite the order -- they propose that they be continued with multiple class representatives until "class certification issues are addressed and determined by the Court to ascertain suitability and typicality of the class representatives' claims."  These kinds of personal injury claims are typically inappropriate for class treatment.  Individual issues of causation, injury, and damages predominate over any alleged common issues.  Choice of law issues can make the class device unmanageable.

MassTortDefense also posted before about defendants' proposal to centralize the cases filed in New Jersey, and plaintiffs' proposal to designate the New Jersey cases as a mass tort.

New Jersey state court Digitek cases have now been designated a mass tort by a New Jersey Supreme Court Order, and have been assigned to the Bergen County Superior Court. The centralized mass tort docket has been assigned to Judge Jonathan N. Harris.

The state’s mass tort website states that Digitek is a medication used to treat heart failure and abnormal heart rhythm. The NJ complaints seek damages, medical monitoring and other relief due to the purchase or ingestion of allegedly defective Digitek tablets which the plaintiffs claim were released with as much as twice the appropriate thickness. The complaints further allege that patients were thus taking twice the intended dosage. A Class I recall was initiated by the defendants after receiving some reports of illness and injuries consistent with potential overdoses of Digitek. It is alleged that this condition is dangerous especially among individuals suffering from renal failure because the Digitek may accumulate in the body of such individuals, rather than be excreted normally in urine. 

The pattern of federal case MDL and mass tort treatment of multiple filings in a given state's court has been seen in numerous other pharmaceutical cases, including Vioxx and Seroquel.
 

Severance Ordered In Digitek MDL

The Digitek MDL judge earlier this month issued a pretrial order regarding multi-plaintiff complaints. In Pretrial Order No. 7, the court ordered the severance of most multi-plaintiff cases (other than spouses). In Re: Digitek Products Liability Litigation, MDL No. 1968 (S.D. W.Va.). The court noted that several complaints in this MDL action join multiple plaintiffs whose only apparent connection with one another is that they allegedly ingested the drug at issue. Other MDL judges have noted the case management, tracking, and other difficulties often accompanying that joinder practice, citing Vioxx and diet drugs.
 

No later than December 31, 2008, plaintiffs’ Co-Lead Counsel are to submit to the court a report identifying multi-plaintiff actions docketed prior to this Order that are subject to severance, and submit on that same date a suitable proposed severance order. One of the reasons plaintiffs resist such severance is the need to pay separate filing fees for all the separate claims filed, but the Order requires the fees.

MassTortDefense has posted on this MDL.  Defendant initiated a nationwide recall of Digitek products, saying tablets with double the appropriate dosage may have been released to the public, with possible side effects. More than 50 Digitek product liability cases were transferred to Chief Judge Joseph R. Goodwin of the Southern District of West Virginia in August.

Consolidated trials are something most mass tort defendants may want to oppose. The pre-trial severance of multi-plaintiff actions here is without prejudice to any party’s right under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 42 to request consolidation of severed actions upon future remand to a transferor court for trial. But better that plaintiffs have the burden of putting cases together than defendant have to overcome the "inertia" of cases that have been consolidated since day one.
 

Digitek MDL Proceeds And State Mass Tort Designation Looms

Certain plaintiffs in the Digitek litigation have filed for mass tort designation in the State of New Jersey, according to a notice filed on the New Jersey Judiciary mass tort web site. Earlier this year, defendant initiated a nationwide recall of Digitek products, stating that tablets with double the appropriate dosage had possibly been released to the public. It said digitalis toxicity was possible in patients with renal failure.

Previously, some plaintiffs had moved for centralized management, but not mass tort designation, of all New Jersey state-court litigation involving the drug Digitek and assignment of that litigation to Bergen County. Anyone wishing to comment on or object to this second application regarding the Digitek  state-court litigation is to provide such comments or objections in writing, with relevant supporting documentation, to the Administrative Office of the Courts, by December 1, 2008. After that date the N.J. Supreme Court will consider and act on both applications regarding Digitek and any comments received.

At the federal level, the judge in the newly-created Digitek federal multidistrict litigation issued an order appointing lead and liaison counsel for the plaintiffs as well as the Plaintiffs' Steering Committee. See In Re: Digitek Products Liability Litigation, MDL No. 1968, JPMDL.; No. 08-md-1968, S.D. W.Va.). Chief Judge Joseph R. Goodwin of the Southern District of West Virginia appointed Carl N. Frankovitch of Frankovitch, Anetakis, Conatonio & Simon, Fred Thompson III of Motley Rice, and Harry F. Bell Jr. of Bell & Bands, as co-lead counsel for the plaintiffs. Bell is also liaison counsel for the plaintiffs. Previously, Chief Judge Goodwin appointed Rebecca A. Betts of Allen, Guthrie & Thomas as defendants' liaison counsel.


Earlier in the fall, the federal court held a pretrial conference jointly with Magistrate Judge Mary E. Stanley and advised the parties of its intention to coordinate heavily with the judges and counsel involved in the state Digitek cases, especially in West Virginia and New Jersey where a majority of the state cases have been filed.