Juice Class Decertified at Close of Discovery

A federal court recently decertified a class action filed on behalf of  juice buyers, recognizing the grave ascertainability problems in the case alleging that the beverage maker misleadingly advertised its drink's health benefits. See In re Pom Wonderful LLC Mktg. & Sales Practices Litig., No. 2:10-ml-2199-DDP-RZ (C.D. Cal. 3/25/14).

Back in 2012, the court had certified a damages class comprised of all persons who purchased a Pom Wonderful 100% juice product between October 2005 and September 2010. After the  completion of discovery, Pom moved to decertify the class, in light of the facts developed and in light of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Comcast Corp. v. Behrend, 133 S. Ct. 1426 (2013). On a motion for decertification, as at the certification stage, the burden to demonstrate that the requirements of Federal Rules of Civil Procedure 23(a) and (b) are met lies with the party advocating certification. E.g., Marlo v. United Parcel Serv. Inc., 639 F.3d 942, 947 (9th Cir. 2011).

The court noted that the Ninth Circuit has adopted a rather narrow reading of Comcast, which holds that, under rigorous analysis, “plaintiffs must be able to show that their damages stemmed from the defendant’s actions that created the legal liability.” Leyva v. Medline Indus., Inc., 716 F.3d 510, 514 (9th Cir. 2013). Thus, the court proceeded to examine plaintiffs’ damages models and the relationship of those models to the plaintiffs’ legal theories. Plaintiffs' expert advanced two damages models. The "Full Refund" model concluded that consumers spent $450 million on Pom’s 100% pomegranate juice and juice blends during the class period, and that class damages are 100% of the amount paid, or $450 million.  Defendant argued that the Full Refund model was invalid because it failed to account for any value consumers received. Even putting aside any potential health benefits, defendant argued, consumers still received value in the form of hydration, vitamins, and minerals.  The court agreed.  The California consumer acts authorize a trial court to grant restitution to private litigants asserting claims under those statutes. Colgan v. Leatherman Tool Group, Inc.,135 Cal.App.4th 663, 694 (2006). “The difference between what the plaintiff paid
and the value of what the plaintiff received is a proper measure of restitution.” In re Vioxx Class Cases, 180 Cal.App.4th 116, 131 (2009). “A party seeking restitution must generally return any
benefit that it has received.” Dunkin v. Boskey, 82 Cal.App.4th 171, 198 (2000).  Since the model did not account for this, it did not comport with Comcast.

The second or "Price Premium" model assumed that, absent the alleged misrepresentations, “demand for Pom would have been less and the Pom market price would have been lower.” The Price Premium model quantified alleged damages “by comparing the price of Pom with other refrigerated juices of the same size.”  This model yielded a damage calculation of “about $290 million.”  The parties agreed that the Price Premium model depended upon a “fraud on the market” theory. Plaintiffs essentially asserted (1) that a presumption of reliance dependent upon defendant’s alleged material misrepresentations establishes the existence of a fraud on the
entire juice market, (2) that because of that fraud on the market, every consumer who purchased defendant’s juices was similarly damaged, regardless of motivation or satisfaction, and (3) damages could therefore be measured on a class-wide basis. But, the court was not aware of any authority applying a fraud on the market theory to this type of consumer action. (It's a securities thing!)  Putting that issue aside, a plaintiff alleging a fraud on the market must show that the relevant market is efficient. See Smilovits v. First Solar, Inc., 295 F.R.D. 423, 429 (D. Ariz. 2013). This court was not persuaded that the market for defendant’s high-end refrigerated juice products operates efficiently.

Third, whether the entire class can be said to have relied upon the alleged  misrepresentations for liability purposes, this did not necessarily speak to the adequacy of a damages model. Plaintiffs must be able to show that their damages stemmed from the defendant’s actions that created the legal liability.  Plaintiff's expert made no attempt upon a sound methodology to explain how defendant’s alleged misrepresentations caused any amount of damages. Instead, the expert  simply observed that Pom’s juices were more expensive than certain other juices. Rather than
answer the critical question why that price difference existed, or to what extent it was a result of Pom’s alleged actions, the expert simply assumed that 100% of that price difference was attributable to the alleged misrepresentations. Rather than draw any link between Pom’s actions and the price difference between the juice average benchmark price and average Pom prices, the Price Premium model simply calculated what the price difference was. This damages “model” did not comport with Comcast’s requirement that class-wide damages be tied to a legal theory.

The other basis for the decision was ascertainability.  In situations where purported class members purchase an inexpensive product for a variety of reasons, and are unlikely to retain receipts or other transaction records, class actions may present such daunting administrative challenges that class treatment is not feasible.  See, e.g., In re Phenylpropanolamine Prods., 214 F.R.D. 614, 620 (W.D. Wash. 2003) (describing critical manageability problems concerning sales of a three dollar medication, despite possibility of fluid recovery); Sethavanish v. ZonePerfect Nutrition Co., 2014 WL 580696 at *5 (N.D. Cal. Feb. 13, 2014) (denying certification because proposed class of nutrition bar purchasers would not be ascertainable).  Here, plaintiffs acknowledged that, based on the volume of product sold, every adult in the United States is a potential class member. Realistically, the class included at least ten to fifteen million purchasers. These millions of consumers paid only a few dollars per bottle, and likely made their purchases for a variety of reasons, observed the court. Few, if any, consumers were likely to have retained receipts during the class period, which closed years before the filing of this action. This case therefore fell well toward the unascertainable end of the spectrum. Here, at the close of discovery and despite plaintiffs’ efforts, there was no way to reliably determine who purchased defendant’s products or when they did so.

Class decertified.

Voluntary Dismissal Not A Route To Appellate Review of Class Issue

Getting an appeals court to focus on class decisions- certification, refusal to certify, and decertification - can be crucial to litigants on both sides of proposed class actions. The Third Circuit recently addressed one tactic in this field, finding that putative class members cannot appeal a district court’s class decertification order after having voluntarily dropped their individual claims in the same court.  The court thus dismissed two appeals brought by employees making wage and hour claims against the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and West Penn Allegheny Health System. See Karen Camesi et al. v. University of Pittsburgh Medical Center et al., No. 12-1446, and Andrew Kuznyetsov et al. v. West Penn Allegheny Health System Inc. et al., No. 12-1903 (3rd Cir. Sept. 4, 2013).

The complaints similarly alleged that proposed class members were not compensated for work performed during meal breaks in violation of the FLSA.  The district court eventually decertifed the collective action. The named plaintiffs did not ask the District Court to certify its interlocutory order for appeal, but, instead, moved under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 41(a) for “voluntary dismissal of their claims with prejudice in order to secure a final judgment for purposes of appeal.” The district court granted the unopposed motion on January 30, 2012, stating that “Plaintiffs’ remaining claim are hereby dismissed with prejudice in order to allow Plaintiffs to seek appellate review.”

The court of appeals began by considering whether appellants’ voluntary dismissal of their claims with prejudice under Rule 41(a) left them with a final order appealable under 28 U.S.C. § 1291. This question of first impression required the panel to consider the scope of two strands of Third Circuit authority: Sullivan v. Pacific Indemnity Co., 566 F.2d 444 (3d Cir. 1977), in which the court held that a plaintiff may not obtain appellate review after incurring a dismissal for failure to prosecute for the purpose of seeking to appeal an interlocutory class-certification order, and Fassett v. Delta Kappa Epsilon, 807 F.2d 1150 (3d Cir. 1986), in which the court ostensibly permitted plaintiffs to voluntarily dismiss a portion of their case in order to appeal an order of the district court terminating the remainder of their case. In considering the significance of these cases, the court seemed impacted most by the fact that appellants here sought review of only the orders decertifying their collective actions, and did not complain of the “final” orders that dismissed their cases.

Generally, a dismissal with prejudice constitutes an appealable final order under § 1291. See, e.g., In re Merck & Co. Sec., Derivative & ERISA Litig., 493 F.3d 393, 399 (3d Cir. 2007). Furthermore, “[u]nder the ‘merger rule,’ prior interlocutory orders [such as class-certification decisions] merge with the final judgment in a case, and the interlocutory orders (to the extent that they affect the final judgment) may be reviewed on appeal from the final order.” In re Westinghouse Sec. Litig., 90 F.3d 696, 706 (3d Cir. 1996).

But here defendants argued that appellants’ voluntary dismissals of their claims constituted impermissible attempts to manufacture finality, and the Third Circuit agreed.  In Sullivan, the court had noted that a class certification decision, per se, is not an appealable final order under 28 U.S.C. § 1291, but rather is an interlocutory order. Dismissal for failure to prosecute, as an attempt to avoid the court's firm position against interlocutory appeals of class certification determinations, was an impermissible strategy there, because if a litigant could refuse to proceed whenever a trial judge ruled against him, simply wait for the court to enter a dismissal for failure to prosecute, and then obtain review of the judge’s interlocutory decision, the policy against piecemeal litigation and review would be severely weakened. Allowing such a practice would risk inundating appellate dockets with requests for review of interlocutory orders and undermine the ability of trial judges to achieve the orderly and expeditious disposition of cases.

Appellants here had attempted to short-circuit the procedure for appealing an interlocutory district court order that is separate from, and unrelated to, the merits of their case. Appellants could have obtained appellate review of the decertification order by proceeding to final judgment on the merits of their individual claims. Or, appellants could have asked the District Courts to certify their interlocutory orders for appeal. But appellants instead sought to convert an interlocutory order into a final appealable order by obtaining dismissal under Rule 41. If the courts were to allow such a "procedural sleight-of-hand" to bring about finality here, said the court of appeals, there was nothing to prevent litigants from employing such a tactic to obtain review of discovery orders, evidentiary rulings, or any of the myriad decisions a district court makes before it reaches the merits of an action. This would greatly undermine the policy against piecemeal litigation embodied by § 1291, concluded the panel.

Both appeals dismissed for failure of jurisdiction.

Homeowner Class Decertified Under Statute of Repose

A federal court last week decertified a class of North Carolina homeowners who alleged breach of warranty against the manufacturer of window trim in a short, interesting decision.  See Hart v. Louisiana-Pacific Corp., No. 2:08-cv-00047 (E.D.N.C., 8/30/13).

Trimboard was a product allegedly sold for use on the exterior of homes. Plaintiffs alleged it was defective in design and manufacture because it allegedly would absorb water, warp, and bulge. The court had certified a homeowner class in July, 2011.

Then in July, 2013, the North Carolina Court of Appeals issued an opinion in Christie v. Hartley Const., Inc., 745 S.E.2d 60 (N.C. App. 2013), clarifying the state's statute of repose.  Per the appeals court, the statute bars claims for damages not filed within the repose period, even in the context of an alleged an express warranty that includes a longer term than the repose peiriod.

Defendants moved for decertification, contending that the recent decision of the Court of Appeals meant that the named plaintiffs' claims were barred by the applicable statute of repose under North Carolina law. "Summary judgment is proper if the pleadings or proof show without contradiction that the statute of repose has expired." Bryant v. Don Galloway Homes, Inc., 147 N.C. App. 655, 657 (2001).

It was undisputed that this suit was filed beyond the six-year statute of repose applicable to the claims of the named plaintiffs. Since any action for damages brought outside of the statute of repose is barred, summary judgment was therefore appropriate as to the claims of the named plaintiffs.

That of course raised issues of adequacy of representation, and more importantly, predominance. The task of  determining which absent plaintiffs would be permitted to bring an action for damages would
necessarily require an individualized determination of factors such as "the later of the specific last act or omission of the defendant giving rise to the cause of action or substantial completion of the improvement." N.C. Gen. Stat. § 1-50(a)(5), under the statute. The necessity for such a determination did in fact destroy "typicality, ... predominance, [and] otherwise foreclose class certification." Gunnells v. Healthplan Services, Inc., 348 F.3d 417,427-28 (4th Cir. 2003).

Accordingly, pursuant to Rule 23(c)(1)(3) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and in light of the Court's broad discretion to certify or decertify a class action, Ward v. Dixie Nat. Life Inc. Co., 595 F.3d 164, 179 (4th Cir. 2010), the class certified by the court's July, 2011 order was decertified. 

 

Consumer Fraud Claims Denied; Class Decertified

A federal court ruled recently for defendant in a proposed class action about the labeling of an iced tea product. See Ries v. Arizona Beverages USA LLC, No. 10-01139 (N.D. Cal., 3/28/13).

We have posted before about plaintiffs' efforts to manufacture consumer fraud class actions out of any aspect of a product label or marketing. Here, plaintiffs brought a class action challenge defendants’ advertising, marketing, selling, and distribution of AriZona Iced Tea beverages labeled “All Natural,” “100% Natural,” and “Natural” because they allegedly contained high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and citric acid. Problem turns out, plaintiffs could muster no proof the marketing was false.

The Complaint set forth six California state law claims for relief: under the False Advertising Law (FAL) for (1) misleading and deceptive advertising, and (2) untrue advertising; under the Unfair Competition Law (UCL), for (3) unlawful, (4) unfair, and (5) fraudulent business practices; and (6) under the Consumers Legal Remedies Act (CLRA), for injunctive and declarative relief.

The defendants filed a motion for summary judgment and plaintiffs filed a motion for class certification. The court initially certified the class under Rule 23(b)(2) for purposes of injunctive and declaratory relief only. At the close of discovery, defendants made a renewed motion for summary judgment, reviving their argument that the named plaintiffs could not support their claims, and had failed to meet their evidentiary burden of showing that defendants’ beverage labeling practices were unfair or misleading. Defendants further moved for decertification of the class.

The court noted that factual predicate for each of plaintiffs’ claims was that the beverages were falsely labeled as “all natural” despite allegedly containing HFCS and citric acid. So plaintiffs had to show that HFCS and citric acid are indeed not natural; and also that accordingly they were entitled to restitution. In their opposition to the motion for summary judgment, plaintiffs did not offer any credible evidence that HFCS is artificial and thus rendered the beverage not natural.  But plaintiffs had no credible evidence, relying primarily on the fact the ingredients were allegedly patented.  But they cited no legal authority supporting their contention that if the process to produce an ingredient is patented, that fact, in and of itself, automatically renders it artificial and no natural. This was, the court observed, merely an extension of their rhetoric that HFCS is artificial because it “cannot be grown in a garden or field, it cannot be plucked from a tree, and it cannot be found in the oceans or seas of this planet.”  The deposition testimony they cited, even when read in the light most favorable to plaintiffs, did not satisfy their evidentiary burden. It certainly did not demonstrate that it is probable that a significant portion of the consuming public could be confused by the “all natural” labeling of defendants’ products. Rather than showing that defendants were attempting to engage in unfair competition by capitalizing on any such confusion, the testimony indicated that everything in the beverages is natural, and that defendants even included labels specifying that they contain all natural tea without preservatives, artificial color, and artificial flavor to clarify that to theoretically confused customers.

On the restitution issue, the court noted there must be evidence that supports the amount of restitution necessary to restore to the plaintiff, meaning the difference between what the plaintiff paid and the value of what the plaintiff received.  Plaintiffs had no such evidence to support their prayer for restitution and disgorgement. Plaintiffs offered not a scintilla of evidence from which a finder of fact could determine the amount of restitution or disgorgement to which plaintiffs might be entitled if this case were to proceed to trial. This failure alone provided an independent and sufficient basis to grant defendants summary judgment.  

The court also found that plaintiffs' failures undermined the finding of adequacy of representation under Rule 23(a)(4). The class was therefore decertified. One wonders why it was certified in the first place.


The class was decertified, the motion for summary judgment was granted, and a motion to exclude expert opinion testimony was denied as moot.

Consumer Fraud Class Action Decertified in Drug Case

A state appeals court last week de-certified a class action by consumers over alleged misrepresentations in marketing a drug.  See Merck & Co. v. Ratliff, No. 2011-000234 (Ky. Ct. App.,  2/10/12).

The case involved the drug Vioxx, which was a highly effective medication formerly in widespread use for patients with arthritis and other conditions causing chronic or acute pain.  Plaintiff was a former user of Vioxx for his chronic osteoarthritis.  Although Ratliff’s insurance paid for most of the cost of the drug, which was at the time approximately $66 per month, Ratliff contributed about $5 each month out of pocket.  Ratliff discontinued using Vioxx in early 2004.

Plaintiff brought a putative class action on behalf of product users who had not suffered cardio-vascular side effects, alleging that the defendant deceived the members of the proposed class in violation of the state Consumer Protection Act by promoting and/or allowing the sale of Vioxx with the use of unfair, false, misleading or deceptive acts or practices.  As a result, the class purchased the drug when it wouldn't have otherwise.

The case followed a twisting path, to federal court, to the MDL, back to state court, up to the state supreme court on mandamus, and back.  Long story short, the class was certified by the trial court, and that decision eventually became ripe for review by the court of appeals.

The Kentucky rules are similar to the federal class action rules. The trial court certified the class under the prong (like b3) requiring that the questions of law or fact common to members of the class predominate over any questions affecting only individual members, and that a class action
is superior to other available methods for the fair and efficient adjudication of the controversy. The trial court found that common questions of law and fact did predominate, stating that there was a common nucleus of facts from which the potential plaintiffs’ claims arose. All of the potential
plaintiffs were prescribed Vioxx by doctors who supposedly relied on Merck’s assertions that it was safe and effective.

On appeal, Merck contended that plaintiff’s claims would require individualized proof such that common questions would not predominate. Merck argued that individual proof would be necessary to show that Merck made fraudulent or negligent misrepresentations toward each putative class member or his or her physician through the marketing and sale of Vioxx, that the alleged
misrepresentations were received by each putative member’s physician, that each putative member’s physician relied on such representations in his or her decision to prescribe Vioxx over another drug, and the amount of any damages suffered by each putative member.

The court of appeals noted that the common law misrepresentation claims would require proof of causation in the nature of reliance, and while "there are fewer obstacles to a class claim proceeding under the" state consumer protection act, that law still requires loss as a result of the wrongful act. Plaintiffs alleged that there was supposedly a consistent pattern of deception lasting essentially the entire time that Vioxx was on the market, and thus that generalized proof could be used to show the elements of fraud and misrepresentation in this case. This theory concerning generalized proof regarding Merck’s alleged conduct was similar to the rebuttable presumption of reliance and causation known in securities litigation as "fraud-on-the-market." The court of appeals noted that the “fraud-on-the-market” approach had never been recognized in the state for a fraud or misrepresentation case. Indeed, pretty much every other jurisdiction which has been confronted with the theory has rejected it outside of the securities litigation context. See, e.g., Kaufman v. i-Stat Corp, 754 A.2d 1188, 1191 (N.J. 2000); International Union of Operating Engineers Local No. 68 Welfare Fund v. Merck & Co., Inc, 929 A.2d 1076, 1088 (N.J. 2007); Mirkin v. Wasserman, 858 P.2d 568, 584-95 (CA. 1993); Southeast Laborers Health and Welfare Fund v. Bayer Corp., 2011 WL 5061645 (11th Cir. 2011); Buckman Co. v. Plaintiffs’ Legal Committee, 531 U.S. 341 (2001).

Accordingly, causation, reliance, and damages must be shown on an individual basis. Thus, if the action were tried as a class, even after the alleged common questions of Merck’s representations were decided, the case would essentially fragment into a series of amalgamated “mini-trials” on each of these individualized questions. Because these individualized questions would substantially overtake the litigation, and would override any common questions of law or fact concerning defendant’s alleged conduct, the court found that a class action was not the superior mechanism by which to try these cases. See, e.g., Zinser v. Accufix Research Institute, Inc., 253 F.3d 1180, 1192 (9th Cir. 2001).

 

 

Ninth Circuit Decertifies Consumer Fraud Class

The Ninth Circuit last week reversed the certification of a nationwide class raising consumer fraud claims against an auto maker. See Mazza, et al. v. American Honda Motor Co., No. 09-55376 (9th Circuit). 

Honda appealed the district court’s decision to certify a nationwide class of all consumers who purchased or leased Acura RL's equipped with a Collision Mitigation Braking System (“CMBS”). The plaintiffs alleged that certain advertisements misrepresented the characteristics of the CMBS and supposedly omitted material information on its limitations. The complaint stated four claims under California Law, specifically the California Unfair Competition Law (UCL), Cal. Bus. & Prof. Code § 17200 et seq., False Advertising Law (FAL), Cal. Bus. & Prof. Code § 17500 et seq., the Consumer Legal Remedies Act (CLRA), Cal. Civil Code § 1750 et seq., and a claim for unjust enrichment.  Readers know those are the typical claims in a consumer fraud case in the popular forum of California.

The Ninth Circuit held that the district court erred because it erroneously concluded that California law could be applied to the entire nationwide class, and because it erroneously concluded that all consumers who purchased or leased the relevant Acura RL can be presumed to have relied on defendant’s advertisements, which allegedly were misleading and omitted material information.

In 2007, plaintiffs bought Acura RL's from authorized Acura dealerships, and the vehicles were equipped with the CMB System. In December 2007, they filed a class action complaint alleging
that Honda misrepresented and concealed material information in connection with the marketing and sale of Acura RL vehicles equipped with the CMBS. According to Plaintiffs, Honda did not warn consumers (1) that its CMB collision avoidance system’s three separate stages may "overlap,"  (2) that the system may not warn drivers in time to avoid an accident, and (3) that it allegedly shuts off in bad weather.

The district court certified a nationwide class of people in the United States who, between August 17, 2005 and the date of class certification, purchased or leased new or used Acura RL vehicles
equipped with the CMBS. The district court concluded that California law could be applied to all class members because Honda did not show how the differences in the laws of the various states were material, how other states might have an interest in applying their laws in this case, and how these interests were implicated in this litigation. It also held that class members were entitled to an
inference of reliance under California law.

Before certifying a class, the trial court must conduct a rigorous analysis to determine whether the party seeking certification has met the prerequisites of Rule 23.  The party seeking class certification has the burden of affirmatively demonstrating that the class meets the requirements
of Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 23. And, under Rule 23(b)(3), a plaintiff must demonstrate the
superiority of maintaining a class action and show that the questions of law or fact common to class members predominate over any questions affecting only individual members.  Here, Honda contended that common issues of law did not predominate because California’s consumer protection statutes may not be applied to a nationwide class with members in 44 jurisdictions.
It further contended that common issues of fact did not predominate because the court  impermissibly relied on presumptions that all class members were exposed to the allegedly
misleading advertising, that they relied on misleading information in making their purchasing decision, and that they were damaged as a result.

First, choice of law. Under California’s choice of law rules, the class action proponent bears the initial burden to show that California has significant contact to the claims of each class member. Also, California law may only be used on a class-wide basis if the interests of other states are not found to outweigh California’s interest in having its law applied.  Honda argued that the district court misapplied the three-step governmental interest test.  The Ninth Circuit agreed. The district court abused its discretion in certifying a class under California law that contained class members
who purchased or leased their car in different jurisdictions with materially different consumer protection laws.  For example, some state consumer fraud laws have no scienter requirement, whereas many other states’ consumer protection statutes do require scienter. See, e.g., Colo.
Rev. Stat. 6-1-105(1)(e), (g), (u) (knowingly); N.J. Stat. Ann. § 56:8-2 (knowledge and intent for omissions); Debbs v. Chrysler Corp., 810 A.2d 137, 155 (Pa. Super. 2002) (knowledge
or reckless disregard).  Some states require named class plaintiffs to demonstrate reliance, while some other states’ consumer protection statutes do not.  These differences are "not trivial or wholly immaterial."  

The court of appeals reminds us that consumer protection laws are a creature of the state in which they are fashioned. They may impose or not impose liability depending on policy choices made by state legislatures. Each state has an interest in setting the appropriate level of liability for companies conducting business within its territory.  Maximizing consumer and business welfare, and achieving the correct balance for society, does not inexorably favor greater consumer protection; instead, setting a baseline of corporate liability for consumer harm requires balancing these competing interests.  Getting the optimal balance between protecting consumers and attracting foreign businesses, with resulting increase in commerce and jobs, is not so much a policy decision committed to a federal appellate court, or to particular district courts where a plaintiff may sue, as it is a decision properly to be made by the legislatures and courts of each state. More expansive consumer protection measures may mean more or greater commercial liability, which in turn may result in higher prices for consumers or a decrease in product availability.  Here, the district court did not adequately recognize that each foreign state has an interest in applying its law to transactions within its borders and that, if California law were applied to the entire class, foreign states would be impaired in their ability to calibrate liability to foster commerce.

The court of appeals also found that the district court abused its discretion in finding that common issues of fact predominated, because the scale of the advertising campaign here did not support a presumption of reliance, even if one were legally available.  It was likely that many class members were never exposed to the allegedly misleading advertisements, insofar as advertising of the challenged system was very limited. And it was not dispositive that Honda’s advertisements were allegedly misleading because of the information they omitted, rather than the information they claimed.  For everyone in the class to have been exposed to the omissions, it was necessary for everyone in the class to have viewed the allegedly misleading advertising. Here the limited scope of that advertising makes it unreasonable to assume that all class members viewed it.
Honda’s product brochures and TV commercials fell short of the extensive and long-term fraudulent advertising campaign that might support a presumption in the eyes of some courts.  Even if Honda allegedly might have been more elaborate and diligent in disclosing the limitations of the CMB system, its advertising materials did not deny that limitations exist. A presumption of reliance does not arise when class members were exposed to quite disparate information from various representatives of the defendant.  California courts have not allowed a consumer who was never exposed to an alleged false or misleading advertising campaign to recover damages under California’s UCL.  

State Supreme Court Applies Lessons of Dukes to Toxic Tort Class Action

Louisiana's Supreme Court last week reversed the certification of a class action brought by property owners over the alleged release of contaminants from a wood-treating site. See Price, et al. v. Martin, et al., No. 2011-C-0853 (La. 2011).  What should catch readers' eyes is the court's reliance on the U.S. Supreme Court's Wal-Mart v. Dukes decision in this mass tort case. we have been following the lower courts' treatment of that decision, and this case represents a sensible application of the Court's commonality analysis.

Several  individuals residing in the vicinity of the Dura-Wood Treating Company filed a proposed class action on behalf of persons who allegedly suffered damages as a result of operations at the wood-treating facility.  The petition alleged that the Dura-Wood facility was primarily engaged in the production of creosote-treated railroad ties. Plaintiffs alleged that various environmentally unsound practices caused a significant amount of hazardous and toxic chemicals to be released into the environment, including the air, soil, and water, of the communities in which plaintiffs resided.  For example, according to the petition, from 1940 to mid-1950, significant quantities of creosote sludge were deposited into area canals and ponds. According to plaintiffs, the allegedly negligent releases increased their risk of disease, caused property damage, and diminished property values. Plaintiffs also alleged that defendants’ activities constituted a nuisance.

Plaintiffs filed a Motion for Class Certification, asserting that more than 3,000 persons, firms, and entities had been damaged by defendants’ conduct and that the issues common to the
class -- generally liability issues --  predominated over individual issues.  The trial court granted plaintiffs’ motion, certifying a class defined as “property owners who owned property within the class area at the time the property was damaged during the years of 1944 through the present.   The court of appeals affirmed and the state supreme court granted cert.

The court began by noting that the class action rules do not set forth a mere pleading standard; rather, a party seeking class certification must affirmatively demonstrate his compliance
with the rule – that is, he must be prepared to prove that there are in fact sufficiently numerous parties, common questions of law or fact, etc. citing Dukes, 131 S.Ct. at 2551.  That a class can be decertified or later amended does not excuse a failure to take a rigorous look at prerequisites. Taking that careful look, the supreme court found that lower court erred in ruling that the commonality prerequisite was met and, further, in determining that the requirements that common issues predominate over individual issues and that the class device be superior were also satisfied.

The requirement that there be questions of law or fact common to the class (in La. C.C.P.
art. 591(A)(2) and in federal Rule 23(a)) is in language that is “easy to misread" since any competently crafted class complaint literally raises common questions. Dukes, 131 S.Ct. at 2551, quoting Nagareda, Class Certification in the Age of Aggregate Proof, 84 N.Y.U.L. Rev. 97, 131-32 (2009). The mere existence of common questions, however, will not satisfy the commonality requirement. Commonality requires a party seeking certification to demonstrate the class members’ claims depend on a common contention, and that common contention must be one capable of class-wide resolution – one where the determination of its truth or falsity will resolve an issue that is central to the validity of each one of the claims in one stroke. Dukes, 131 S.Ct. at 2551. In the context of mass tort litigation, said the court, each member of the class must be able to prove individual causation based on the same set of operative facts and law that would be used by any other class member to prove causation.

Here, thousands of property owners sued for alleged damage caused from 1944 to the present by the alleged emission of toxic chemicals from operations at the wood treating facility. The
essence of the causes of action was that the named defendants conducted activities which harmed the class members by depositing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dioxins in the attic dust of their residential and commercial properties. Plaintiffs argued this presented common questions, as they alleged that injury could be shown not by examining individual
residences, but by showing that elevated toxin levels emanated from the defendants’ facility “on an area-wide basis,” and that this issue, when decided for one class member, would thus be decided for all.

This represented a misinterpretation of the law and of plaintiffs’ burden of proof. To establish the “common issue” they posited, plaintiffs would be required to present evidence not simply that emissions occurred, but that the emissions resulted in the deposit of unreasonably elevated levels of chemicals on each plaintiff's property. And this issues must   be  capable  of common resolution for all class members based on common evidence. Moreover, the proof of commonality must be “significant.”

The court then proceeded to list some of the many reasons why the issues were not common.  The facility had three owners in the span (although only two were sued). These owners engaged in independent and varying operations throughout the approximately 66-year period of alleged emissions. The specific operations that plaintiffs alleged resulted in off-site emissions were varied –such as overflow, runoff,  and the burning of wood -- and occurred at varied and unspecified times during the period in question. Moreover, the facility’s operations changed over time. For example,certain burning processes ceased in or around 1982. Also, the chemicals used at the facility changed over time.

In an important, but often overlooked point, the court noted that the legal standards applying to the operations of the wood-treating facility have changed over time. For example, whether principles of strict liability or negligence would govern the conduct of defendants depended on the
year the damaging emission occurred. Likewise, exemplary damages were not available for some years, by statute. The applicable standards for air emissions varied also, with the enactment of the Clean Air Act decades after the class period began, and various amendments to it over time. Time raised another individual issue: while the attic dust from various properties was tested for contaminants, there was no attempt to determine when contaminants were deposited in the attics of the buildings that were tested.  Finally, over time there were varying alternative sources of the contaminants, including myriad area-wide and property-specific alternative sources of PAHs and dioxins in the defined class area.

For class certification to be appropriate, there must be some common thread which holds the claims together. With regard to causation and injury, plaintiffs thus failed to present sufficient evidence to prove the existence of that common thread.

For many of the same reasons, common issues did not predominate, and the class was not a superior method of resolving the dispute.  The court also noted the existence of potential conflicts between current owners and prior owners of the respective properties.  Also militating against class certification was the fact that several class members had already brought individual claims against these same defendants for personal injuries and property damage allegedly caused by the same facility emissions.

Class certification reversed.  

Federal Appeals Court Vacates Class Action Verdict In Radiation Case

Last week, a federal appeals court vacated a $926 million judgment against Rockwell International  and Dow Chemical over alleged plutonium contamination. See Cook v. Rockwell International Corp., No. 08-1224 (10th Cir., 9/3/10).

The owners of properties near the former Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant (“Rocky Flats”) filed a proposed class action against the facility’s operators under the Price-Anderson Act, alleging trespass and nuisance claims arising from the alleged release of plutonium particles onto their properties. Rocky Flats, located near Denver, Colorado, was established by the US in the 1950s to produce nuclear weapon components. The government contracted with Dow to operate the facility from 1952 to 1975, and then with Rockwell from 1975 to 1989.

Some radiation cases seem to last longer than the half-life of uranium.  The complaint here was filed in 1990.  A class was certified in 1993. After over fifteen years of litigation, the district court conducted a jury trial between October, 2005 and January, 2006, resulting in a jury verdict in favor of the plaintiff class, which numbered about 15,000.

This appeal ensued, and a main issue was the jury instructions (we leave for another day the preemption and PAA statutory issues). In accordance with the district court’s construction of Colorado law, the jury instructions did not require plaintiffs to establish either an actual injury to their properties or a loss of use of their properties. With respect to the nuisance claims, the district court instructed the jury that plaintiffs could establish defendants’ conduct interfered with the use and enjoyment of the class properties by proving defendants’ conduct exposed plaintiffs to “some increased risk of health problems” or caused conditions “that pose a demonstrable risk of future harm" to their property area.  As to plaintiffs’ trespass claims, the district court instructed the jury that plaintiffs were not required to show that plutonium is present on the class members' properties at any particular level or concentration, that they suffered any bodily harm because of the plutonium, or that the presence of plutonium damaged these properties in some other way.

First, the nuisance theory. Under Colorado law, a plaintiff asserting a nuisance claim must establish an interference with the use and enjoyment of his property that is both “substantial” and “unreasonable.”  A jury may find the presence of radioactive contamination creates an actual risk to health and thereby interferes with a plaintiff’s use or enjoyment of his land if the contamination disturbs the plaintiff’s comfort and convenience, including his peace of mind, with respect to his continued use of the land.  But, said the court,  a scientifically unfounded risk cannot rise to the level of an unreasonable and substantial interference. To the extent plaintiffs here relied on anxiety from an increased risk to their health as an interference with the use and enjoyment of their properties, that anxiety must arise from scientifically verifiable evidence regarding the risk and cannot be wholly irrational. No reasonable jury could find that irrational anxiety about a risk that cannot be scientifically verified tips this balance so as to render the interference "unreasonable."  So the charge was wrong to the extent it permitted any subjective anxiety to suffice for an unreasonable interference.

The court of appeals then turned to the trespass theory.  And here, the issue turned on whether the plaintiffs' claim was a traditional trespass theory or a so-called "intangible trespass."  The parties agreed that to prevail under a traditional trespass claim, a plaintiff must establish only a physical intrusion upon the property of another without the proper permission from the person legally entitled to possession. A plaintiff need not establish any injury to his legally protected interest in the land or damage to the land itself.  Unlike a traditional trespass claim, however, the court made clear that an intangible trespass claim requires an aggrieved party to prove physical damage to the property  caused by such intangible intrusion. 

So is the invasion of plutonium particles onto real property a traditional or intangible trespass claim?  The cases suggest that “intangible” is something that is impalpable, or incapable of being felt by touch. Noise intrusion and electromagnetic fields emitted by power lines are examples of the intangible. Neither can be perceived by any of the senses.   Here,  plaintiffs had to concede that the plutonium particles allegedly present on their properties are impalpable and imperceptible by the senses. Although the particles in question have mass and are "physically present" on the land, because the particles are impalpable, the trespass alleged here must be tried as an intangible trespass.

Consequently, the instructions on this point were also in error, and on remand, plaintiffs will be required to prove the plutonium contamination caused “physical damage to the property” in order to prevail on their trespass claims.

Interestingly, because the district court’s class certification analysis failed to consider whether
plaintiffs could establish various elements of their claims, properly defined, the 10th Circuit also reversed the district court’s class certification ruling. Upon remand, the district court will have to  revisit the class certification question to determine whether plaintiffs can establish the proper elements of their claims on a class-wide basis.  Obviously, the need to show unreasonable interference and physical damage may each create predominating individual issues.