"Doe" Wins Challenge to CPSC Database

Readers may recall we have posted before about an unnamed company that had filed a suit, under seal, to challenge aspects of the Consumer Product Safety Commission's new public database. The federal district court found for the company earlier this week, ruling that the agency's attempt to publish an incident report on the database about the company's product was arbitrary and capricious, and an abuse of discretion. See Company Doe v. Tenenbaum, No. 8:11-cv-02958 (D. Md.10/9/12).

The Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 mandated the creation of a consumer product safety information database, and from the beginning, there was controversy about the absence of an adequate process for addressing false and inaccurate reports that will scare consumers, harm business, and generate no additional safety gains; the need to employ means to prevent the submission of fraudulent reports of harm while not discouraging the submission of valid reports; the importance of not putting the governmental imprimatur on voluntary data that has not been verified; and the absence of a sufficient time period allocated for manufacturers to evaluate and respond to any proposed report.

Much of the opinion is redacted, but the suit related to material inaccuracies with respect to a report of alleged injury that found its way into the database. The company protested inclusion of the report, and presented evidence regarding the alleged injury and alleged risk of harm. The CPSC apparently redacted the report twice in an attempt to make it not materially inaccurate. Plaintiff then sued, saying the issues had not been fixed, and later used results of the CPSC's ongoing investigation of the product to renew its objections.  Eventually, the CPSC rejected the company's final objection to the many-times redacted report.

The court cannot substitute its judgment for the agency's but can overturn arbitrary and capricious agency actions.  The court found that the publication decision was an abuse of discretion, because it violated the requirement that the harm "relate to" the use of the product, and would violate the prohibition of publication of materially inaccurate information.  Related to was correlated with associated with or connected with, and the CPSC initial agreements to redact much of the report as inaccurate undercut the later argument that a sufficient "relation to" had been demonstrated to let the final version be published. And mere speculation about a causal link was not sufficient evidence of an actual connection. Similarly a theoretical possibility or mere mathematical possibility was not proof of a sufficient relationship.

On the second prong, the court attempted to put itself in the shoes of the average consumer, and to use inferential reasoning to conclude the report was materially inaccurate and misleading. Interestingly, the court found that the CPSC standard disclaimer that it does not guarantee the accuracy of outside submitted reports, this was "boilerplate" that would not be of interest to the average consumer.

Finally, the court rejected the CPSC's "doomsday" arguments about the impact of the case on the database. The regulations expressly permit a challenge to materially misleading reports, and the court referenced a 2011 GAO report on the evealuation of reports, so a finding that a report is indeed inaccurate would not bring the "apocalypse."  Nonetheless, the ruling appears to represent a clear victory for consumer product manufacturers who are worried about inaccurate consumer complaints.  The decision does not strike at the idea of the database itself as much as it may encourage the CPSC to take a closer look at any reports that a manufacturer challenges as materially inaccurate or misleading.

House Committee Votes To End Funding for CPSC Database

The House Appropriations Committee voted last week (tally 27–21) to send a funding bill to the House floor that would cut off funds from being used for the Consumer Product Safety Commission's new consumer database.

Readers may recall that the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 mandated the creation of a consumer product safety information database, and from the beginning, there was controversy about the absence of a process for addressing false and inaccurate reports that will scare consumers, harm business, and generate no additional safety gains; the need to employ means to prevent the submission of fraudulent reports of harm while not discouraging the submission of valid reports; the importance of  not putting the governmental imprimatur on voluntary data that has not been verified; and the absence of a sufficient time period allocated for manufacturers to evaluate and respond to any proposed report.

As we have posted, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission gave final approval late last year to the new consumer product safety database, overriding very real concerns about who should be permitted to submit incident reports and how they will be verified as accurate. CPSC commissioners split along party lines in the 3-2 vote, which came after a final discussion of whether the regulation would simply give certain interest groups a new forum to attack product makers and plaintiff lawyers a new tool, giving rise to lawsuits based on a rumor repeated through the echo chamber of the Internet.

Manufacturers have limited control over what information can be removed or amended once posted. The two dissenting votes made an unsuccessful attempt to amend the final rule so as to give manufacturers more time to comment on or respond to the accuracy of postings before they are published to the database and to the public.

The database is accompanied by a weak disclaimer stipulating that CPSC has not verified the accuracy of any report. Observes worry that the agency has not paid sufficient attention to legitimate issues of a manufacturer's goodwill and reputation, to the costs of unnecessary panic among product consumers, and the mischief that plaintiffs' lawyers might cause with unwarranted increase in litigation against manufacturers.

The bill just passed out of committee would cut CPSC's overall budget by about $3.5 million—approximately the same amount needed for the database—from FY 2011 levels, and provides that  no funds may be used to carry out any of the database activities.  It appears the bill will be taken up on the House floor in July. 

While consumer groups have opposed the funding cut-off, the majority on the committee agreed with the concern about the risks of unverifiable and inaccurate consumer comments that may be submitted. In the meantime, a 2011 continuing resolution requires the GAO to conduct an analysis of the database.

 

 

CPSC to Hold Webinars on New Product Safety Database

The Consumer Product Safety Commission is holding two Web conferences to demonstrate to interested stakeholders various aspects of its new (and still controversial) consumer product safety information database.  The conferences will focus on the incident reporting form, industry registration and comment features, and the search function of the publicly available part of the database.

The first Web conference will be held from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. today, January 11, 2011, and the second Web conference will be held from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Thursday, January 20th. The first Web conference will focus on the incident form that the public will use to file a report of harm and the search function of the database. The Web conference is intended to inform all interested stakeholders of the information required on the form to be used to report an incident, in addition to an explanation of the public search function of the Database.  The second Web conference will focus on the industry registration and comment features, the process for reporting incidents, and the public search component of the database.  It will address how to access and use the new business portal, and how to register an account on the business portal, which is designed to facilitate more efficient electronic notice, review, and comment on reports of harm before they are published in the database.  The database is set to go live March 11 through the CPSC's website.

As we have noted, the database raises a number of significant issues for our readers, as the CPSC will not be able to guarantee the accuracy of reports before it publishes them on the database, important confidentiality concerns may be compromised, and the data appears vulnerable to trolling and misuse by plaintiff lawyers.  Reports of harm will be published in the database 10 business days after the company has been provided notice of the report of harm. The CPSC has acknowledged that it will not be able to independently verify the accuracy of the information in the reports in that time, so  manufacturers will need to attempt to ask the CPSC to remove “materially inaccurate information” and “confidential information” in the report before it is published, or file comments about the report of harm to be published along with the report in the database.  As a practical matter, it may be difficult for a company to fully investigate the allegations in the report in that time frame. Moreover, any such investigation will likely not include an interview of the person who filed the report, because the person filing the report can choose to not release his or her name.

Reports may be filed not only by consumers but by health care workers, attorneys, and many others. Plaintiffs' lawyers have an unhealthy incentive to seed the database with self serving reports, and, at the least, may search the database looking for products to go after.

Again, companies should register with the CPSC so that they can receive the most timely notice of a report filed about their products.  It may make sense to consider developing an SOP for reviewing and following up on reports in the database, including designation of a lead reviewer or team to follow through. This SOP may include a plan for quickly preparing the appropriate documentation that the company's products are in fact reasonably safe, and for dealing with any adverse PR.  


 

CPSC Approves Product Safety Database Rule

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission last week gave final approval to the controversial
new consumer product safety database, overriding very real concerns about who should be permitted to submit incident reports and how they will be verified as accurate. Readers may know that Section 212 of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (‘‘CPSIA’’) amended the Consumer Product Safety Act (‘‘CPSA’’) to require the Commission to establish and maintain a publicly available, searchable database on the safety of consumer products, and other products or substances regulated by the Commission.

CPSC commissioners split along party lines in the 3-2 vote, which came after  a final discussion of whether the regulation would simply give certain interest groups a new forum to attack product makers and plaintiff lawyers a new tool, giving rise to lawsuits based on a rumor repeated through the echo chamber of the Internet.

The rule will give consumers access to reports of alleged product-related safety incidents via a new publicly accessible database.  Consumers, government agencies, and various public health and safety interest groups will be able to post largely self-verified reports related to the safety of any product regulated by the CPSC.

Manufacturers will have limited control over what information can be removed or amended once posted.  The two dissenting votes made an unsuccessful attempt to amend the final rule so as to give manufacturers more time to comment on or respond to the accuracy of postings before they are published to the database and to the public. 

The database will be accompanied by a weak disclaimer stipulating that CPSC has not verified the accuracy of any report.  But the Democratic commissioners rejected any system by which the CPSC could investigate obviously questionable claims and find out the origin of such reports before allowing the public to see and use them.   We posted about these very issues last Spring, and argued that the CPSC had not fully addressed them.  It still seems that insufficient attention has been paid by the majority commissioners to legitimate issues of a manufacturer's goodwill and reputation, to the costs of unnecessary panic among product consumers, and the mischief that plaintiffs' lawyers might cause with unwarranted increase in litigation against manufacturers.

Accordingly, a product seller may only make a comment in response to the report of harm, which may be published; claim the report of harm contains confidential business information, triggering a CPSC review of the claim; and/or claim the report of harm contains materially inaccurate information (e.g., that it is not the manufacturer or private labeler of the product), triggering a CPSC review of the claim. Materially inaccurate information is narrowly defined to include information that is false or misleading and relates to a matter which is so substantial and important as to affect a reasonable consumer’s decision making about the product. 

CPSC is expected to have the database go live at www.saferproducts.gov in March, 2011. In the meantime, the Commission plans to start outreach on business portal registration and features; conduct workshops with manufacturers and private labelers; offer training webinars; and finalize the new incident report form.

CPSC Shares Public Comments on Product Database

The Consumer Product Safety Commission is in the process of reviewing comments submitted on the impending consumer product safety information database. The agency has posted the comments received.

No surprise, those consumer-oriented interest groups in favor of a database generally praise what CPSC is proposing to do, and industry groups reiterate concerns they have about the implementation of the database concept.

As we have posted before, even back to the time Congress was considering this provision, there remain concerns about the accuracy and confidentiality of reports of alleged injury submitted and conveyed back tot he public in the database;  and the CPSC remains vague about how it will provide "due process" for product sellers who could find the database being used against them even when it contains erroneous, duplicate, or confidential data.  for manufacturers and private labelers.  There seems scant attention to legitimate issues of a manufacturer's goodwill and reputation, to the costs of unnecessary panic among product consumers, and the mischief that plaintiffs' lawyers might cause with unwarranted increase in litigation against manufacturers.


Organizations such as  the National Association of Manufacturers noted that false or inaccurate information does not serve the interests of consumers. Congress knew that counterfeit products are too common in the marketplace and may be confused with real brand name products.  Manufacturers and private labelers of products have a legitimate interest in protecting their brands from inaccurate, defamatory, and intentionally false statements and in protecting trade secret and confidential commercial information.  Accordingly, a request for confidential treatment “is not a matter that should be left to the discretion of a CPSC staffer,” NAM said.

Industry groups also worried about the CPSC's unduly broadening the list of people who can submit a report to the database. Broadening the list of reporting parties does not serve the Congressional interest in providing accurate information to consumers about reports of harm. It is obvious why parties included in CPSC's broad proposed listing of "others" may not be reliable reporters of an incident. CPSC has largely added parties who are more likely to have an agenda that goes beyond merely advising CPSC of an incident. The possibility that someone might attempt to seed the database with inaccurate or misleading information to provide ostensible support for lawsuits is a real concern. 

So far, the Commission has not ensured that the CPSC will deal with accuracy challenges in a timely manner. Conceivably, busy CPSC staff might take weeks, months, or even years to determine whether information that is posted on the database is materially inaccurate.  CPSC has also set up a catch-22 procedure for handling such challenges. CPSC has asked firms who wish "expedited" treatment to submit no more than five pages including attachments to show a problem. However, CPSC has simultaneously set a standard of  "significant evidence" to support claims that information is materially inaccurate.  To provide sufficient evidence to support a challenge, a manufacturer may need to provide more than 5 pages of information; however, if they do so,  CPSC will publish first, and resolve the challenge at some indefinite time in the future.

These parts of the proposal likely will not withstand judicial scrutiny, nor should they have any credibility with the public.

 

Window Closing on Time to Comment on CPSC Draft Strategic Plan

In 2008, as readers know, the CPSC was granted extensive new regulatory authorities and mandates to on consumer product safety issues through the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA).   So what's next? The Commission recently completed a strategic planning process intended to help align resources with agency priorities to meet what it sees as the key challenges moving into the next decade.

The CPSC is for only a short time longer accepting comments on a new draft of its 2011–2016 strategic plan.  As globalization and technological advances expand the range of products on the market, the risks and opportunities associated with these advancements make the challenge of overseeing and regulating the thousands of product types all the more complex, says CPSC. Some risks include the growth of global supply chains that assemble products across a vast web of interconnected geographies, the difficulty of identifying product hazards among hundreds of thousands of containers entering US ports, and the new ways in which the public receives product information through the Internet and other media sources.

The revised plan details CPSC efforts to set consumer product safety priorities, efficiently identify and respond to product hazards, improve public outreach efforts, and raise awareness of potential product risks. The plan grew out of interviews and focus groups with 76 internal and external stakeholders to obtain feedback on the CPSC’s performance and how the agency can improve in the future (these individuals and groups included a cross-section of diverse stakeholders: consumer organizations, industry associations, the CPSC headquarters staff, the CPSC field staff, other federal agencies, and states’ attorneys general).

One goal of the plan is to find ways the CPSC can reduce the number of unsafe imported products entering the U.S. marketplace, such as by strengthening its bilateral and multilateral relationships with foreign regulators and manufacturers. The draft also states that CPSC wants to improve its response time for removing hazardous products from the market. 

A third major aspect of the plan relies on the new public product safety database, which is scheduled for launch in March 2011.  The database will allow consumers and others to submit reports of alleged harm in a Web-based, publicly search-able format to the CPSC. The database is to be designed with the needs of multiple types of users in mind. Creation of the database is being guided by a series of public hearings, focus groups, and joint workshops with CPSC staff to determine how manufacturers, retailers, and consumer advocates expect to use the database and how they think it should work. The new system is supposed to make it simple for consumers, industry representatives, health officials, and any other member of the public to report safety incidents and view publicly reported incident information that the CPSC has amassed on a particular consumer product safety concern.

We reported earlier this year on the notice of proposed rulemaking that would establish a publicly available consumer product safety information database. As we have noted at MassTortDefense, CPSC still needs to develop a rigorous and timely process for addressing false and inaccurate reports-- those that will scare consumers, harm business, and generate no additional safety gains. The commission needs to employ means to prevent the submission of fraudulent reports of harm while not discouraging the submission of valid reports. CPSC also needs to think about specific disclaimers it should make with regard to the accuracy of the information contained in the public database, and not put any governmental imprimatur on voluntary data that has not been verified. A sufficient time period should also be allocated for manufacturers to evaluate and respond to any proposed report.
 

CPSC Issues Proposed Rule on Database

The Consumer Product Safety Commission has issued a notice of proposed rulemaking that would establish a publicly available consumer product safety information database.  Readers may know that Section 212 of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (‘‘CPSIA’’) amended the Consumer Product Safety Act (‘‘CPSA’’) to require the Commission to establish and maintain a publicly available, searchable database on the safety of consumer products, and other products or substances regulated by the Commission. We posted on some of the potential issues before.  Serious questions surround the potential posting of inaccurate, incomplete, or confidential information as part of the database.

The proposed rule would interpret the various statutory requirements pertaining to the information to be included in the database and also would establish provisions regarding submitting reports of harm; providing notice of reports of harm to manufacturers; publishing reports of harm and manufacturer comments in the database; and dealing with confidential and materially inaccurate
information.  The new regs would consist of four subparts:  Subpart A—Background and Definitions; Subpart B—Content Requirements; Subpart C—Procedural Requirements; Subpart D—Notice and Disclosure Requirements.

Some of the highlights: A submitter of a report of harm must affirmatively verify that he or she has reviewed the report of harm and that the information contained therein is true and accurate to
the best of the submitter’s knowledge, information and belief.  As part of verifying the report, submitters of reports of harm must indicate which category they are in (consumer,
government agency, health care professional etc.).

Proposed § 1102.12(a) would state that manufacturers who receive a report of harm transmitted from the CPSC may submit comments. Proposed § 1102.12(b) would propose that comments may be received via an on-line manufacturer portal where the manufacturer can register to submit comments on a secure nonpublic portal that will be provided through the Commission’s database. The proposal also would specify that comments may be submitted via electronic mail or regular mail. The Commission will publish a manufacturer’s comments related to a report of harm if the comment specifically relates to a report of harm, contains a unique identifier assigned to it, contains the manufacturer’s verification of the truth and accuracy of their comment (similar to the verification required of a submitter of a report of harm) as well as their consent for publication in the database. The proposed rule would require a manufacturer to affirmatively request that its comment be published and to affirmatively consent to such publication in order for the manufacturer comment to be published in the database.

CPSC says it will not publish confidential information in the database. Proposed §1102.24 explains how the Commission will define ‘‘confidential information’’ and would set forth criteria which must be followed to assert a claim of confidentiality. The Commission notes its view that most reports of harm received from consumers will not likely contain confidential information. However, where such a claim for a portion of information on a report of harm is asserted, the proposal would require affirmative statements that would assist the Commission in an evaluation of the merits of the request. The proposal would establish parameters for asserting and supporting a claim of a portion of a report of harm as confidential. For example, proposed § 1102.24(b)(3) would require an explanation on whether the asserted confidential portion of the report is commonly known or readily ascertainable by outside persons with a minimum of time and effort. Proposed § 1102.24(b)(5) would explain that the manufacturer also must support a confidentiality claim by describing how release of the information could cause competitive harm. Overall, one wonders whether the CPSC is trying to create a barrier to a valid claim of confidentiality much higher than in other contexts.

Proposed § 1102.26 would contain definitions and the process for how claims of materially inaccurate information contained in reports of harm may be asserted and how they will be evaluated. Materially inaccurate information in a report of harm means information that is false or misleading in a significant and relevant way that creates or has the potential to create a substantially erroneous or substantially mistaken belief in a database user about information in a report of harm relating to:
(i) The identification of a consumer product;
(ii) The identification of a manufacturer or private labeler; or
(iii) The harm or risk of harm related to use of the consumer product.

Written comments must be received by July 23, 2010.  It is not clear that the database plan offers adequate safeguards or assurances that the information posted will be true and accurate, will not simply lead to consumer confusion, and will not give rise to lawsuits based on a rumor repeated through the echo chamber of the Internet.  Although not as strong as we have called for here at MassTortDefense, § 1102.42 does have a disclaimer to the effect that the Commission does not guarantee the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of the contents of the Database, particularly with respect to the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of information submitted by persons outside of the CPSC. The Consumer Product Safety Information Database will contain a notice to this effect that will be prominently and conspicuously displayed on the database and on any documents that are printed from the database.
 



 

Consumer Product Safety Commission Issues Draft Guidance on Definition of "Children's Products"

As readers know, much of the recent policy focus of the Consumer Product Safety Commission (as well as Congress) has been on the safety of products used by children. But what is a "children's product"?  The CPSC has announced it is issuing a proposed interpretive rule aimed at providing further guidance as to what constitutes a “children's product” to mitigate potential confusion among manufacturers about how to comply with the relevant new safety requirements, such as under the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act.  The proposal would provide additional guidance on the factors that must be considered when evaluating what is a children's product. Written comments and submissions in response to this notice must be received by June 21, 2010.

Section 3(a)(2) of the CPSA (as amended by the CPSIA) defines a "children's product'' as a consumer product designed or intended primarily for children 12 years of age or younger. A determination of whether a product is a "children's product'' will be based on consideration of  four specified statutory factors, but because each of those four factors incorporates the concept of  "use'' by the child in some manner, under the proposed rule the Agency would further interpret the term "for use'' by children 12 years or younger to generally mean that children will physically interact with such products based on the reasonably foreseeable use and misuse of such product.

First factor: a manufacturer's statements about the product's intended use, including a label on such product; a manufacturer's statement that the product is not intended for children does not preclude a product from being regulated as a children's product if the primary appeal of the product is to children 12 years of age or younger. Similarly, a label indicating that a product is for ages 10 and up does not necessarily make it a children's product if it is a general use product. Such a
label may recommend 10 years old as the earliest age for a prospective user, not necessarily the age for which the product is primarily intended.

Second factor: if the product is represented in its packaging, display, promotion, or advertising as appropriate for use by children 12 years of age or younger. These representations can be express
(such as product advertising declaring that the product is for use by children 12 years of age or younger) or implied (such as product advertising showing the product being used by young children). These representations may be found in packaging, text, illustrations and/or photographs depicting consumers using the product, instructions, assembly manuals, or advertising media used to market the product. The prominence, conspicuousness, and or other emphasis given to each portrayal of a product's uses or intended users on packaging or in advertising media can be weighted differently according to which images or messages are the strongest and most obvious to the consumer at the point of purchase. For example, labeling in large, high contrast letters on the front of a package can send a stronger message than block letters in a small box on the package's side panel. Besides labeling and illustrations, a product's physical location in a retail outlet or visual associations in the pages of an on-line distributor's Web site could imply its suitability for a certain age group. The close association of a product in a store or on a Web site with other products that are clearly intended for children 12 years of age or younger could affect consumer perceptions of the intended age group for that product.

Third factor: whether a consumer product is designed or intended primarily for a child 12 years of age or younger is whether the product is commonly recognized by consumers as being intended for use by a child 12 years of age or younger. For example, traditional board and table games like chess, checkers, backgammon, playing cards, or Chinese checkers are commonly recognized as equally attractive to children and adults because the level of difficulty increases or decreases depending on the player's skill. Versions of these games, and similar games commonly considered by consumers to appeal to a general audience, are not considered children's products. However, if a manufacturer adds marketing portrayals or other features to the game or its packaging that make it more attractive to or suitable for children than a general use product would normally be, then the game could be  considered a children's product. Examples include small sizes that would not be comfortable for the average adult; exaggerated features (large buttons, bright indicators) that simplify the product's use by kids; safety features that are not found on similar products intended for adults; colors commonly associated with childhood (pinks, blues,
bright primary colors); features that do not enhance the product's utility, (such as cartoons), but contribute to its attractiveness to children 12 years of age or younger.

Fourth factor: the Age Determination Guidelines (``Guidelines'') issued by the CPSC staff in 2002, which focus on an age determination for a given product's intended user group,  The Guidelines provide information about the primary goals of play that are seen for different ages throughout childhood. For example, toddlers consistently want to mouth objects because mouthing is a primary strategy for exploration of any object at that age. Early  childhood entails lots of exploration and discovery. High levels of detail in their toys are not necessary, and toddlers like bright
colors. However, during middle childhood, children become very interested in role-playing, and they desire increasingly more realistic props during their playtime, and more realistic colors become
important. After a certain age, children do not consider the simplistic, brightly colored toys intended for toddlers to be intended for them and may find them very unappealing or even insulting. Nine to
12 year old children are interested in developing new motor skills and exercising their increasingly complex problem solving abilities. The factors that make various objects appealing to children of different ages are discussed at length in the Guidelines.

The proposed rules also offer examples in a number of product lines.

CPSC Chair Offers Comments on Database

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission Chairwoman Inez Tenenbaum testified last week at a  hearing before the U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Financial Services and General Government.  She noted that her agency was preparing to staff up for 2011 in anticipation of greater enforcement efforts under the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008.  

Tenenbaum was seeking a slight increase in CPSC's approximately $118 million funding. She testified that the budget will allow CPSC to hire 46 new full-time employees, bringing total staffing staffing levels more than 1.5 times the complement as recently as in 2008.  Tenenbaum also noted that the CPSC would work closely with small businesses to ensure that CPSIA third-party verification requirements do not become a costly burden, by dedicating a business ombudsman to address concerns.

She testified that the CPSC is currently in the process of building the Consumer Product Safety Risk Management System, a Web-based database that is supposed to change the way CPSC collects, analyzes and deploys data about regulated products. She reiterated that the system is scheduled to be up and running by March 11, 2011.

We have posted about this database before.  And we had the opportunity to hear the Chair speak on the issue at the recent DRI Products Liability Annual Meeting.  She noted she understand the level of concern about the database.  The CPSC has issued a proposed notice of rulemaking on the database, and the recent Open Commission Briefing/Meeting on Public Database - Notice of Proposed Rules-making is available. To concerns from the manufacturing community about whether the database might allow for unconfirmed reports about their products, she noted that the CPSC does not want to publish inaccurate or confidential information. Every report of harm that is submitted will be reviewed by a member of the agency’s staff and, further, every report that identifies a manufacturer will be sent to that manufacturer, generally within 5 business days. She stressed the creation of a non-public manufacturer portal to speed receipt of and replies to these reports. She also stated that the agency will protect proprietary and confidential information from the companies.

While those goals are worthy, CPSC needs to develop a rigorous and timely process for addressing false and inaccurate reports-- those that will scare consumers, harm business, and generate no additional safety gains. The commission needs to employ means to prevent the submission of fraudulent reports of harm while not discouraging the submission of valid reports. CPSC also needs to think about specific disclaimers it should make with regard to the accuracy of the information contained in the public database, and not put any governmental imprimatur on voluntary data that has not been verified. A sufficient time period should also be allocated for manufacturers to evaluate and respond to any proposed report.