Committee Approves Amendments to Civil Rules

Earlier this month, the Federal Courts' Committee on Rules of Practice and Procedure approved for publication a package of proposals that would, if enacted, impact the scope of discovery under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.

The agenda for the committee's June, 2013 meeting is here. The various proposals would appear to narrow discovery and try to curb some of the abuses that have occurred in recent years.  Many of these ideas came out of the 2010 Duke Conference as methods for reducing cost and delay in civil litigation.

Some highlights: New Rule 4(m) would be revised to shorten the time to serve the summons and complaint from 120 days to 60 days. The desired effect will be to get the action moving in half the time. The amendment responds to the commonly expressed view that four months to serve the summons and complaint is too long.

Rule 16(b)(2) now provides that the judge must issue a scheduling order within the earlier of 120 days after any defendant has been served or 90 days after any defendant has appeared. The recommended
revision, however, cuts the times to 90 days after any defendant is served or 60 days after any defendant appears. 

Another proposal  would add a new Rule 16(b)(3)(v), permitting a scheduling order to "direct that before moving for an order relating to discovery the movant must request a conference with the court." Many courts now have local rules similar to this proposal. Experience with these rules shows that an informal pre-motion conference with the court often resolves a discovery dispute without the need for a motion, briefing, and order. The practice has proved highly effective in reducing cost and delay.

Currently, Rules 30 and 31 establish a presumptive limit of 10 depositions by the plaintiffs, or by the defendants, or by third-party defendants, and a time limit. Rule 33(a)(1) sets a presumptive limit of "no more than 25 written interrogatories, including all discrete subparts." There are no presumptive numerical limits for Rule 36 requests to admit. The new proposals reduce the limit on interrogatories to 15. They add to Rule 36, for the first time, presumptive numerical limits of 25 RFA (other than genuineness of documents). The proposals would reduce the presumptive limit on the number of depositions from 10 to 5, and would reduce the presumptive duration to 1 day of 6 hours. Rules 30 and 31 would continue to provide that the court must grant leave to take more depositions "to the extent consistent with Rule 26(b)(1) and (2)." 

The proposed rule changes would re-emphasize the notion of proportionality in Rule 26: discovery must be proportional to the needs of the case considering the amount in controversy, the importance of the issues at stake in the action, the parties’s resources, the importance of the discovery in resolving the issues, and whether the burden or expense of the proposed discovery outweighs its likely benefit. This newly added proportionality language stems from the committee’s finding that the current rule’s “reasonably calculated” approach to the proper scope of discovery is too broadly interpreted.

Also, new proposed Rule 37(e) would provide certain protections against sanctions for the failure to produce any type of evidence (whether electronic or other evidence).  A party seeking sanctions would have to show both substantial prejudice and willful or bad faith conduct; or that the conduct irreparably denied a party any meaningful opportunity to present or defend against a claim. The amendments also seek to address the issue of parties who might otherwise be inclined to engage in burdensome and expensive “over-preservation.” 

Next step is a comment period that will extend into early 2014. It will important to keep an eye on the progress of these amendments.

Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 26: Amendment Update

We love to hear from our faithful readers, and one recently asked us to update the status of the proposed amendments to Rule 26. We posted on them last year, noting that there would be public comment opportunities throughout 2009.

Below, a review of those comments.  But first a reminder of the proposed changes. The amendments would extend work-product protection to the discovery of draft reports by testifying expert witnesses and, with three important exceptions, to the discovery of communications between testifying expert witnesses and retaining counsel. The amendments also provide that a lawyer relying on a witness who will provide expert testimony but is not required to provide a Rule 26(a)(2)(B) report – because the witness is not retained or specially employed to provide expert testimony and is not an employee who regularly gives expert testimony – must disclose the subject matter of the witness’s testimony and summarize the facts and opinions that the witness is expected to offer. The 1993 amendments to Civil Rule 26 have been interpreted by some courts to allow discovery of all draft expert witness reports and all communications between counsel and testifying expert witnesses. The experience under those amendments revealed significant practical problems in the eyes of many litigators.

The comments? First, the arguments in favor:

• Lawyers and expert witnesses take elaborate and costly steps to avoid creating any discoverable draft report or any discoverable communications between the lawyer and expert. These steps can include hiring two sets of experts, one to testify and one to consult; avoiding any note-taking by the expert; and avoiding the creation of any draft report. At the same time, lawyers take elaborate and
costly steps to attempt to discover all of the other side’s drafts and communications.


• Experience has shown that the elaborate steps to avoid creating discoverable drafts or communications result in inefficient, costly, and wasteful litigation behavior. At the same time, experience has also shown that extensive, time-consuming, and costly efforts to discover every change in draft reports by experts and every communication between experts and retaining counsel rarely produces information that bears on the strengths or weaknesses of the experts’ opinions.

• Many experienced lawyers routinely stipulate that they will not seek to discover draft reports from each other’s experts or communications between the experts and the retaining lawyers. That good lawyers stipulate to avoid the present rule indicates problems with it.

• Some states have implemented procedures similar to the proposed amendments.  State  practitioners representing both plaintiffs and defendants report a degree of consensus about the success of these procedures in improving the ability to use expert witnesses and to discover the basis for their opinions.


• The proposed amendments would not limit discovery into the areas that are genuinely important for learning the strengths and weaknesses of a testifying expert’s opinion. The proposed amendments specifically allow discovery into communications between a lawyer and testifying expert about: (1) the compensation for the expert’s study or testimony; (2) the facts or data provided
by the lawyer that the expert considered in forming opinions; and (3) the assumptions provided by the lawyer that the expert relied upon in forming an opinion.

Opposing Views:

• The proposed amendments limit discovery that could show the extent of the retaining lawyer’s influence on the testifying expert’s opinions. That could make it easier for lawyers to influence the opinions their testifying experts present.

• The proposed amendments only limit discovery of draft reports and certain communications. They do not apply to inquiries into such matters at the trial itself. It may be unclear whether the draft reports and communications will be protected from disclosure at trial. As a result, the amendments may not eliminate the costly and wasteful steps to avoid creating draft reports or records of attorney/expert communications. (MassTortDefense wonders how many lawyers will venture into these issues at trial without the benefit of any discovery.)

Overall, comments received during the notice-and-comment period made it appear that the vast majority of practitioners, on both the plaintiff and defense sides, support the proposed rule amendments. Interestingly, lots of academics spoke up against the rule.

So what's the status? On September 15, 2009, the Judicial Conference met and approved the recommendations of the Committee on Rules of Practice and Procedure and approved the proposed rules. The rules were then transmitted to the Supreme Court in December with a recommendation that they be approved and transmitted to Congress in accordance with the Rules Enabling Act.  The schedule would still have them taking effect, if not rejected by the Court or Congress, on December 1, 2010.