Another All Natural Class Shot Down

A federal court rejected a proposed class of  New York consumers challenging the “all natural” labeling of four Crisco oils that allegedly contained genetically modified ingredients.   See Ault v. J.M. Smucker Co., No.13-03409 (S.D.N.Y., 8/6/15).

On May 21, 2013, Plaintiff Adrianna Ault filed a complaint alleging that Defendant violated N.Y. Gen. Bus. Law ("GBL") §§ 349 and 350, and breached an express warranty by labeling certain Crisco cooking oils as "All Natural." Plaintiffs proposed class included: consumers who purchased one or more of the following products in New York: Crisco Pure Vegetable Oil and/or Crisco Pure Com Oil between February 15,2 009 and June 1, 2014; and/or Crisco Pure Canola Oil and/or Crisco Natural Blend Oil between June 1, 2010 and June 1, 2014.

According to Plaintiff, the "All Natural" label was deceptive for two reasons. First, Defendant allegedly purchased from third parties the crude soy, canola, and corn oils from which it
manufactures its cooking oils. Some of such crude oils were allegedly derived from GMO crops, and Defendant allegedly did not differentiate between GMO and non-GMO crops when purchasing crude oils.  Second, Plaintiff argued that the "All Natural" label was misleading because the Natural
Label Oils were "heavily processed" using chemicals: after Defendant purchases source oils from its suppliers, it allegedly refined the oils using a multi-step process,  Plaintiff argued that, as a result, the Natural Label Oils are chemically altered and highly processed, and cannot be considered "natural."

Plaintiffs moved for class certification.  Defendant responded that class certification is improper because the term "natural" is not susceptible to a uniform meaning. The Food and Drug Administration has declined to adopt a definition of "natural," Consumers define "natural" in diverse ways. Defendant pointed to a survey conducted by its expert, which determined that 55% of respondents could not define or did not even know what "All Natural" cooking oil meant.

Defendant argued that class certification must also fail because consumers bought the Natural Label Oils for many reasons unrelated to whether the products were "natural." According to the  Survey, respondents' most common considerations in deciding whether to purchase cooking oil were price and brand awareness.  Only 1.6% of respondents indicated that whether an oil was "natural" factored into their purchasing decision. Under the New York General Business Law, the plaintiff must demonstrate that she "sustained injury as a result" of defendant's action, and the plaintiff must show that she suffered a loss "because of' the defendant's "deceptive act." Rodriguez v. It 's Just Lunch, Int 'l, 300 F.R.D. 125, 147 (S.D.N.Y. 2014). Defendant argued this element highlighted individual issues among the class members.

The court noted that class action law recognizes an "implied requirement of ascertainability." In re Initial Pub. Offering Sec. Litig., 471 F.3d 24, 30 (2d Cir. 2006). A class is ascertainable if it is "readily identifiable, such that the court can determine who is in the class and, thus, bound by the ruling." Charrons v. Pinnacle Group NY LLC, 269 F.R.D. 221, 229 (S.D.N.Y.2010). The class must be "defined by objective criteria that are administratively feasible," and identifying class members should not "require a mini-hearing on the merits of each case." Id.

Here, it was undisputed that many potential class members will not have retained records of their
cooking oil purchases.  Plaintiffs argued that some class members could be identified by retailer records.  But, the court concluded, this fell well short of establishing ascertainability. While the criteria may be objective, Plaintiff had not shown that it was "administratively feasible." See Charrons, 269 F.R.D. at 229. The mere assertion that "records exist to identify many class members" does not suffice. Defendant sold to retailers and distributors, not to consumers, and therefore has no records regarding the ultimate purchasers of the Natural Label Oils. Plaintiffs' information did not relate exclusively to New York retailers, and there was no evidence concerning what percentage of sales this data represents, nor whether such data would identify more than a small percentage of class members.

As many plaintiffs do, the argument was made that self-identification was also a feasible method for determining class membership; however, there was no proof of  how such self-identification would be authenticated. Most courts reject such an approach, especially when there were a variety of related products only some of which fall within the class definition. Often, putative class members are unlikely to remember accurately every purchase during the class period, and soliciting  declarations from putative class members regarding their history of purchases would invite them to speculate, or worse. Here, defendant was selling nine different brands of cooking oil, only four of which ever bore the challenged label. Permitting potential class members to self-identify would require them to specifically recall each variety of Crisco cooking oil they purchased during the class period. Adding to the confusion, the "All Natural" label appeared on the four brands at different times, and the proposed class period was defined differently for the Vegetable and Corn Oils  than the Canola and Natural Blend Oils.  Based on the class definition, therefore, an individual who purchased Crisco Corn Oil in 2009 would be a member of the class, but one who purchased Canola Oil that same year would not. "Who could possibly recall that level of detail six years (or more) later?"  Indeed, the named Plaintiff herself could not recall the number of bottles of Crisco cooking oil  she had purchased during the class period.

The court turned next to commonality and predominance. Commonality requires plaintiffs' claims to "depend upon a common contention" that is  "capable of class-wide resolution-which means that determination of its truth or falsity will resolve an issue that is central to the validity of each one of the claims in one stroke." Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. v. Dukes, 131 S. Ct. 2541, 2551 (2011). The determining factor is not whether common questions exist, but rather "the capacity of a class-wide proceeding to generate common answers apt to drive the resolution of the litigation." !d. The predominance requirement "is a more demanding criterion than the commonality inquiry under Rule 23(a)." Moore v. PaineWebber, Inc. , 306 F.3d 1247, 1252 (2d Cir. 2002). Class-wide issues predominate if "resolution of some of the legal or factual questions ... can be achieved through generalized proof," and are "more substantial than the issues subject only to individualized proof." Id.  Although individualized damages determinations alone traditionally did not preclude certification under Rule 23(b )(3), the fact that "damages may have to be ascertained on an individual basis" is a factor that courts "must consider in deciding whether issues susceptible to generalized proof outweigh individual issues." Roach v. T.L. Cannon Corp., 778 F.3d 401, 408-09 (2d Cir. 2015). A plaintiffs damages model "must be consistent with its liability case," and  must "measure only those damages attributable to that theory." Comcast Corp. v. Behrend, 133 S. Ct. 1426, 1433 (2013). 

Here, plaintiff asserts that the injury to Plaintiff and class members was subject to common
proof' because the inclusion of the "All Natural" label had the effect of increasing the price of
the cooking oils for everyone.  Yet, Plaintiff offered no evidence that a price premium actually existed for cooking oils labeled "All Natural," nor had she proposed a reliable method for determining the existence or amount of any such price premium.  This plaintiffs proposed a survey to identify the allege price premium.  But such a methodology is not "consistent with [Plaintiffs] liability case," see Comcast Corp., 133 S. Ct. at 1433, because it made no attempt to calculate the amount that consumers actually overpaid due to the "All Natural" label. Rather than analyzing actual pricing and sale data for the Natural Label Oils, plaintiffs' expert merely proposed to ask some unspecified subsection of Crisco customers what they would pay for a hypothetical Crisco product. Moreover, this analysis further compounded the problems with the ascertainability of the class, by designating potential class members- many of whom may be unidentifiable--as the very individuals who will determine the amount of damages to which they are entitled.

Accordingly, Plaintiffs motion for class certification under Rule 23(b)(3) was denied.

 

Court of Appeals Affirms Rejection of Unascertainable Class

The 11th Circuit earlier this month upheld a district court's rejection of a proposed class action, relying on the ascertainability doctrine. See Karhu v. Vital Pharm., Inc., No. 14-11648, 2015 WL 3560722 (11th Cir. June 9, 2015).

Defendant marketed a dietary supplement called VPX Meltdown Fat Incinerator (“Meltdown”), which it allegedly advertised for fat loss. Plaintiffs brought a proposed class-action suit, alleging that it does not aid fat loss.  Plaintiffs moved to certify a class of nationwide Meltdown purchasers, as well as a subclass of New York purchasers.  The district court denied Karhu's motion, holding that the proposed classes satisfied neither Rule 23's implicit ascertainability requirement, nor the requirements listed in either Rule 23(b)(2) or (3). Plaintiffs appealed, and the court of appeals affirmed without reaching the district court's Rule 23(b)(3) analysis.

Rule 23 implicitly requires that the proposed class is adequately defined and clearly ascertainable. A class is not ascertainable unless the class definition contains objective criteria that allow for class members to be identified in an administratively feasible way. Bussey v. Macon Cnty. Greyhound Park, Inc., 562 F. App'x. 782, 787 (11th Cir.2014). Identifying class members is administratively feasible when it is a “manageable process that does not require much, if any, individual inquiry.” Id. 


Invoking these rules, the district court denied Karhu's motion for class certification, holding that Karhu had failed to establish that his proposed classes were ascertainable. Specifically plaintiffs had failed to propose a realistic method of identifying the individuals who purchased Meltdown. The product was sold primarily to “distributors and retailers,” such that defendant's records could not be used to determine the identities of most class members.The product's low cost meant most class members would not retain their proof of purchase.  The district court also rejected an affidavit-based method. Without verification (discovery), the defendant would be deprived of its due process rights to challenge the claims of each putative class member. On the other hand, allowing defendant to contest each affidavit would require a series of mini-trials to determine class membership, which would not be administratively feasible. 

Plaintiffs appealed.  And as noted the 11th Circuit affirmed.  A plaintiff seeking certification bears the burden of establishing the requirements of Rule 23, including ascertainability.  In order to establish ascertainability, the plaintiff must propose an administratively feasible method by which class members can be identified. See Stalley v. ADS Alliance Data Syst., Inc., 296 F.R.D. 670, 679–80 (M.D.Fla.2013); Hill v. T–Mobile, USA, Inc., No. 2:09–cv–1827–VEM, 2011 WL 10958888, at *10–11 (N.D.Ala. May 16, 2011); see also Carrera v. Bayer Corp., 727 F.3d 300, 306–07 (3d Cir.2013) (“A plaintiff may not merely propose a method of ascertaining a class without any evidentiary support that the method will be successful.”).  A plaintiff cannot establish ascertainability simply by asserting that class members can be identified using the defendant's records; the plaintiff must also establish that the records are in fact useful for identification purposes, and that identification will be administratively feasible. Similarly, a plaintiff cannot satisfy the ascertainability requirement by proposing that class members self-identify (such as through affidavits) without first establishing that self-identification is administratively feasible and not otherwise problematic. See Fisher v. Ciba Specialty Chems. Corp., 238 F.R .D. 273, 301–02 (S.D.Ala.2006); Perez v. Metabolife Int'l, Inc., 218 F.R.D. 262, 269 (S.D.Fla.2003) (holding ascertainability not established when “the only evidence likely to be offered in many instances will be the putative class member's uncorroborated claim that he or she used the product”).

The potential problems with self-identification-based ascertainment are intertwined. On the one hand, allowing class members to self-identify without affording defendants the opportunity to challenge class membership provides inadequate procedural protection to defendants and implicates their due process rights. Perez, 218 F.R.D. at 269; see also Marcus v. BMW of N. Am., LLC, 687 F.3d 583, 594 (3d Cir.2012).  On the other hand, protecting defendants' due process rights by allowing them to challenge each claimant's class membership can be administratively infeasible, because it requires a series of mini-trials just to evaluate the threshold issue of which persons are class members.  

In light of these standards, the district court's ascertainability holding was not an abuse of discretion. Karhu's proposal to identify class members using  “sales data” was incomplete, insofar as Karhu did not explain how the data would aid class-member identification. Nor was any other potential identification procedure obviously workable: the sales data identified mostly third-party retailers, not putative class members. The district court likewise acted within its discretion when it rejected identification via affidavit. Plaintiffs had not established how the potential problems with such a method would be avoided.

Worth noting for our readers is the court of appeals'  explanation of how ascertainability differs from manageability. Ascertainability addresses whether class members can be identified at all, at least in any administratively feasible (ok, manageable) way. But the manageability concern at the heart of the ascertainability requirement is prior to, and hence more fundamental than, the manageability concern addressed in Rule 23b3.  

Class Rejected Again Under Ascertainability Doctrine

We have posted before about the important doctrine of ascertainability, implicit in Rule 23's requirements.  And last year we posted about a federal court in New Jersey rejecting a class certification effort by plaintiffs complaining about the marketing of Skinnygirl Margaritas.

Following the Third Circuit decision clarifying one aspect of the ascertainability doctrine, in Byrd v. Aaron's Inc., 784 F.3d 154 (3d Cir. 2015), as amended (Apr. 28, 2015), plaintiffs tried a second time to show that class membership could be adequately determined.  See Bello v. Beam Global Spirits & Wine, Inc., No. CIV. 11-5149 NLH/KMW, 2015 WL 3613723 (D.N.J. June 9, 2015). The District Court again rejected the claim.

Many courts and commentators have recognized that an essential prerequisite of a class action, at least with respect to actions under Rule 23(b)(3), is that the class must be currently and readily ascertainable based on objective criteria.  If class members are impossible to identify without extensive and individualized fact-finding or mini-trials, then a class action is inappropriate.  The Third Circuit has explained that the ascertainability requirement serves several important objectives. First, at the commencement of a class action, ascertainability and a clear class definition allow potential class members to identify themselves for purposes of opting out of a class. Second, it ensures that a defendant's rights are protected by the class action mechanism. Third, it ensures that the parties can identify class members in a manner consistent with the efficiencies of a class action. If a class cannot be ascertained in an economical and administratively feasible manner, significant benefits of a class action are lost.

The method of determining whether someone is in the class must be administratively feasible. Administrative feasibility means that identifying class members is a manageable process that does not require much, if any, individual factual inquiry. To satisfy ascertainability as it relates to proof of class membership, the plaintiff must demonstrate his purported method for ascertaining class members is reliable and administratively feasible, and permits a defendant to challenge the evidence used to prove class membership. The Third Circuit has also held that a plaintiff does not meet his burden of showing by a preponderance of the evidence that there is a reliable and administratively feasible method for ascertaining the class when the only proof of class membership is the say-so of putative class members or if ascertaining the class requires extensive and individualized fact-finding.

Plaintiffs cited the clarification in Byrd as an avenue to submit the Declaration of an expert which purported to detail a claim submission process to identify class members in this matter. According to the Declaration, the screening method would involve three levels of claims validation to reduce the likelihood that individuals who submit fraudulent claims would be included in the class. One level included a supposed review by “sophisticated and state-of-the-art data matching technologies that identify patterns of duplication.” Plaintiffs also contended that the damages in this case would not be determined from claimants' proofs of purchase, but rather from Defendants' total sales.  Defendants responded that nothing had changed since the Court's prior denial of class certification, and that the expert's method had only been used in the context of settled class actions, and not in ascertaining class membership in litigated disputes. The Defendants expressed concern that potential class members would not accurately recall the details of their alleged purchases, such as the date of purchase, and the proposed process would do little to weed out fraudulent or inaccurate claims; in the end the individualized fact-finding as to each affidavit submitted that would be necessary to assess claim validity. 

The Court was not convinced that the putative classes in this case were ascertainable. The Third Circuit's concern that membership in the class cannot be ascertained other than the “say so” of proposed class members remained applicable here. Plaintiffs had not proposed an objective way of identifying class members, suggesting only the submission of claim forms by putative class members without any verifiable records or documents to corroborate the claims. The named plaintiffs in this case had already demonstrated difficulty remembering the details of their purchases,which implicated the defendant's ability to challenge class membership. A process requiring reliance on affidavits of putative class members as the primary method of ascertaining the members of the class “leaves Defendants without a suitable and fair method for challenging these individuals' purported membership in the class.”

Plaintiffs still had not offered a suitable method by which the Court could identify class members with any reliability. Defendants represented that they had no records to specifically identify the class members because they did not sell Skinnygirl Margarita directly to consumers. The Court found that the process proposed by the new expert did not demonstrate a reliable and administratively feasible mechanism for ascertaining class members.  It was unlikely that many, if any, class members had retained a receipt for their purchases of Skinnygirl Margarita approximately four to six years ago. (None of the three named plaintiffs has retained a receipt for their purchases.)  The proposed methodology also would not detect those instances in which multiple claimants file claims based on one receipt, or where a claimant has fabricated a receipt to support a fraudulent claim, or where a claimant happens to have a receipt but never actually purchased a bottle of Skinnygirl Margarita. Plaintiffs had not presented a mechanism to screen out these fraudulent types of claims, and as such had not demonstrated that their proposed methodology was reliable.

Plaintiffs' inability to remember the specifics of their purchases was not “beside the point,” for it highlighted a major flaw in Plaintiffs' proposed claim process. The specific details surrounding a claimant's purchase of Skinnygirl Margarita were necessary to validate a claim. The "Court is left to wonder how the named plaintiffs, or any claimant, can complete an affidavit attesting under oath to the details of their purchases when they cannot remember such specifics." Under the proposed method, it was unclear (1) whether a purchaser must recall the exact date of purchase versus a more general time frame; (2) an acceptable range of prices; and (3) whether all of the criteria must be accurately identified or, if not, the acceptable number of criteria that must be correctly identified for a claim to advance to the next level of review.

Plaintiffs further proposed cross-referencing claims with social media activity and e-mail communications as another means of providing reliability, but the Court rejected this argument. One inherent problem with Plaintiffs' suggested use of cross-checking social media and e-mail records is that such Facebook and e-mail records, at most, only identify some unknown, unspecified portion of the putative class and may very well include individuals who never bought the product and in fact are not members of the class.  Therefore, Plaintiffs' proposed reliance on affidavits alone, without any objective records to identify class members or a method to weed out unreliable affidavits, failed to satisfy the ascertainability requirement under the law of this Circuit.

Plaintiffs were unable to identify even one consumer class action in which the procedure identified in the expert declaration was used in a litigated class action, rather than one that was settled. Overall, the Court thus found that Plaintiffs had not met their burden of demonstrating the reliability of their model. Finally, the Court rejected Plaintiffs' argument that Defendants' due process rights were protected because the entire damages were purportedly objectively quantifiable and were not based on a claimant's proof of purchase. The ascertainability requirement not only seeks to protect a defendant's rights but is also aimed at protecting the rights of absent class members. As discussed above, there is a possibility that the proposed method for ascertaining the class would result in the submission of fraudulent claims. The recovery of true class members could therefore be diluted by these fraudulent claims. Thus, Plaintiffs' focus only on Defendants in addressing ascertainability of the class was misplaced.  

 

Another Artificial All Natural Class Action Rejected

We have posted before about the plaintiffs' bar ongoing war on innocuous product labels, especially the popular "natural" claims --seeking to take advantage of consumer protection acts designed for situations in which buyers actually suffer measurable damages.

A recent skirmish in this war involves plaintiff's claims that certain cooking oils were not "all natural." Introduced in 1911, the oils are primarily utilized for baking, frying, marinades, and dressings. Defendant produced nine varieties of oil, all bearing the Crisco name -- four of which were at issue here. Plaintiff proposed a class action, alleging that defendant engaged in false, unfair, deceptive and/or misleading trade practices by misrepresenting to consumers that Crisco oils are "All Natural," when they are, in fact, made allegedly in part from genetically modified plants.  Plaintiff averred that she was damaged by overpaying for a nonexistent product attribute--"All Natural."  

The federal court rejected this proposed class of consumers who allegedly purchased these natural cooking oils. See Randolph v. J.M. Smucker Co., 2014 WL 7330430 (S.D. Fla., 12/23/14).  Our review will focus on ascertainability and predominance.  

The burden of proof to establish the propriety of class certification rests with the advocate of the class. Rutstein v. Avis Rent-A-Car Sys., Inc., 211 F.3d 1228, 1233 (11th Cir. 2000). In order for an action to fall under Rule 23, a party must affirmatively demonstrate his compliance with the Rule. Comcast Corp. v. Behrend, 133 S. Ct. 1426, 1432 (2013) (quoting Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. v. Dukes, 131 S. Ct. 2541, 2551 (2011)). It is not sufficient that a party simply plead conformity with the requirements of the Rule; instead, “a party must not only be prepared to prove that there are in fact sufficiently numerous parties, common questions of law or fact, typicality of claims or defenses, and adequacy of representation, as required by Rule 23(a) . . . [t]he party must also satisfy through evidentiary proof at least one of the provisions of Rule 23(b).” Id.  Conclusory statements are insufficient to meet the burden of proof on a motion for class certification). In fact, the Supreme Court has indicated that only after rigorous analysis may certification be granted. See Comcast, 133 S. Ct. at 1432. The trial court can and should consider the merits of the case to the degree necessary to determine whether the requirements of Rule 23 will be satisfied.  Valley Drug Co. v. Geneva Pharm., Inc., 350 F.3d 1181, 1197 (11th Cir. 2003); see also Comcast, 133 S. Ct. at 1432 (“Repeatedly, we have emphasized that it may be necessary for the court to probe behind the pleadings before coming to rest on the certification question . . . .”).

Before establishing the explicit requirements of Rule 23(a), a plaintiff must first establish that the proposed class is “adequately defined and clearly ascertainable.  This threshold issue of “ascertainability” relates in part to whether the putative class can be identified: an identifiable class exists if its members can be ascertained by reference to objective criteria. Bussey v. Macon Cnty. Greyhound Park, Inc., 562 F. App’x 782, 787 (11th Cir. 2014).  These “objective criteria” should be “administratively feasible,” meaning that the identification of class members should be “a manageable process that does not require much, if any, individual inquiries.” Id.  The district court must be satisfied that this requirement can be met even before delving into the rigorous analysis of the explicit Rule 23 elements.  If a plaintiff fails to demonstrate that the putative class is clearly ascertainable, then class certification is properly denied. See Walewski v. Zenimax Media, Inc., 502 F. App’x 857, 861 (11th Cir. 2012).   

Defendant contended that plaintiff had not offered a feasible mechanism for determining the purchasers of the Crisco oils containing the offending “All Natural” label. Second, even assuming that plaintiff could identify the oil purchasers, the court would have to make individualized inquiries, specifically, whether the term “All Natural” was a factor in the individual’s purchasing decisions, and how each individual defines the term “natural.” The court was not persuaded by the argument concerning the ability of class members to self-identify as purchasers, mistakenly believing that in challenging administrative feasibility defendant was seeking to require a class-action plaintiff to present proof that the identification of class members would be "next to flawless."  Nevertheless, the court agreed that the facts and circumstances of the instant case presented plaintiffs with substantial difficulties. During the relevant time period, at least nine different Crisco oils frequented retail establishments, but only four of these oils contained the challenged statement. Moreover, the challenged statement was not placed on all four oils uniformly throughout the class period.  Based on these facts, the likelihood that an individual would recall not only which specific kind of oil, but also, when that oil was purchased, complicated identification of the putative class.

This fact pattern reminded the court of Jones v. ConAgra Foods, Inc., No. C 12-01633 CRB, 2014 WL 2702726 (N.D. Cal. June 13, 2014). In Jones, the plaintiff sought to certify a class of  all persons in the state of California who purchased a certain canned tomato product bearing the label statement  "100% Natural" or "Free of artificial ingredients & preservatives" but which contained certain ingredients. Similar to the case at bar, the plaintiff in Jones argued that the class could be ascertained by reference to objective criteria, namely, whether the consumer claimed he purchased one of the products at issue during the class period.  In finding the class to be unascertainable, the Northern District of California recognized that there were literally dozens of varieties with different can sizes, ingredients, and labeling over time and some such cans included the challenged language, while others included no such language at all. Thus, the court identified this as a “subjective memory problem,” and found that “the variation in defendant's products and labels makes self-identification infeasible.” Id; see also Brazil v. Dole Packaged Foods, LLC, No. 12-CV-01831-LHK, 2014 WL 5794873, at *15 (N.D. Cal. Nov. 6, 2014).

After an extensive review of the record here, the court was inclined to agree that the class was similarly not ascertainable. The fact that putative class members were highly unlikely to retain proof of purchase for such a low price consumer item might be alone insufficient to defeat certification. However, taking the aforementioned variations in Crisco products in conjunction with the fact that the challenged product is a low-priced consumer item, of which the normal consumer likely does not retain significant memory about, the likelihood of a potential class member being able to accurately identify themselves as a purchaser of the allegedly deceptive product, was "slim." Not only would the individual need to recall purchasing Crisco oil, but also the specific variety purchased, and the specific date on which it was purchased beyond simply within the period between “May 2009 [and] the present.” Furthermore, the nature of the product at issue made it less likely for a consumer to recall a specific purchase. Crisco oil is intended to be an additive ingredient to a final product, rather than a final product directly consumed by the user. This fact made it less likely that the consumer would recall the specific purchase of the cooking oil during a specific time frame.

In fact, the named plaintiff’s own testimony reflected this point, failing to recall the number of times Crisco oils were purchased, when they were purchased, and what variations were purchased. Under the facts and record presented, self-identification through affidavit was not administratively feasible.

The Rule 23(b)(3) claim required that common issues predominate, and under the applicable act, FDUTPA, the labels at issue must have been “likely to mislead the consumer acting reasonably in the circumstances,” that is, a probability, not simply a mere possibility, of deception. Millennium Commc’ns & Fulfillment, Inc. v. Office of Attorney Gen., Dep’t of Legal Affairs, State of Fla., 761 So. 2d 1256, 1263 (Fla. 3d DCA 2000).  So the issue here was whether the challenged misrepresentation was likely to deceive a consumer acting reasonably in the same circumstances. However, like the hurdles presented when attempting resolve the issue of ascertainability, plaintiff had not demonstrated that an objectively reasonable consumer would agree with her individual interpretation of “all natural.” Plaintiff’s own evidence supported the assertion that the use of GMOs is a widely disputed issue; the fact is that there is a lack of consensus on the use of such products. See also Krzykwa, 946 F. Supp. 2d at 1374-75 (noting that the FDA has “repeatedly declined to adopt formal rule-making that would define the term ‘natural’”).  

Finally, predominance also requires that damages resulting from the injury be measurable on a class-wide basis through use of a “common methodology.” Comcast, 133 S. Ct. at 1430. A model purporting to serve as evidence of damages in this class action must measure only those damages attributable to that theory. If the model does not even attempt to do that, it cannot possibly establish that damages are susceptible of measurement across the entire class for purposes of Rule 23(b)(3). The Supreme Court has instructed lower courts to conduct a “rigorous analysis” to determine whether the purported damages model fits the liability case. Id. at 1433. Actual damages for a claim brought under FDUTPA is the difference in the market value of the product or service in the condition which it was delivered and its market value in the condition in which it should have been delivered.  Contrary to plaintiff’s contention, more is required than simply demonstrating the existence of a viable damages model.

That is, plaintiff’s theory of liability rested on the fact that defendant’s product contained a “price premium” by virtue of the “All Natural” label.  But plaintiff had not demonstrated that the proposed damages model would be capable of measuring damages on a class-wide basis and tying those damages to the specific issue of liability, that is, the “All Natural” label. Other than the "bald, unsupported assertion" that this method would work, plaintiff presented no hard-and-fast evidence that the alleged premium was capable of measurement.  Nor had plaintiff demonstrated that the model could isolate a premium received by the inclusion of the alleged misrepresentation. See Werdebaugh, 2014 WL 7148923, at *14 (“Plaintiff has failed to show that his proposed damages stemmed from the defendant’s actions that created the legal liability.”  Accordingly, plaintiff had failed to present sufficient evidence of a viable damages model capable of estimating damages on a class-wide basis as is required by Comcast.
 

Long-lasting Lipstick Class Kissed Off

A federal court has rejected a proposed class of plaintiffs who alleged that they purchased deceptively labeled lipstick and foundation, in part because of an inability to show class-wide damages. See Algarin v. Maybelline, LLC,  No. 12-03000 (S.D. Cal., 5/12/14).

Maybelline manufactures, markets, sells, and distributes SuperStay 24HR Lipcolor, a line of lipcolors, and SuperStay 24HR Makeup, a line of skin foundations, Plaintiffs alleged these products were marketed to provide "all day comfort,” that withstands “heat, sweat, and humidity,” but allegedly do not. Plaintiffs alleged they paid a price premium because of the company's claims. On behalf of a proposed California class of consumers who bought the SuperStay products, they asserted claims under the California Unfair Competition Law and Consumers Legal Remedies Act.

In assessing the motion for class certification, the court found that there were issues with the proposed class definition. Plaintiffs defined the class as: “[a]ll California consumers who purchased SuperStay 24HR Lipcolor and/or SuperStay 24HR Makeup for personal use."  Given the number of differences between the two products, including but not limited to, pricing differences, claims differences, labeling differences, and ultimately merits differences, the Court questioned whether creating sub-classes would be needed. Beyond that, though not explicitly stated in Rule 23, courts have held that the class must be adequately defined and clearly ascertainable before a class action may proceed. See Chavez v. Blue Sky Natural Beverage Co., 268 F.R.D. 365, 376 (N.D. Cal. 2010) .  A class is sufficiently defined and ascertainable if, among other things, it is administratively feasible for the court to determine whether a particular individual is a member. See O’Connor v. Boeing N. American, Inc., 184 F.R.D. 311, 319 (C.D. Cal. 1998).   It must be administratively feasible to determine whether a particular person is a class member as an identifiable class exists if its members can be ascertained by reference to objective criteria, but not if membership is contingent on a prospective member’s state of mind. While here the class definition seemed ascertainable in the sense that class membership might be determined based on an objective criterion -- whether members purchased either the SuperStay lipcolor of the SuperStay makeup --  Plaintiffs failed to provide a reliable method of determining who the actual members of the class were. So it was not ascertainable in the sense that members could actually ever be determined. Plaintiffs failed to show how it was “administratively feasibile" to determine whether a particular person was a class member. The court correctly noted that this inquiry overlaps with the “manageability” prong of Rule 23(b)(3).

Specifically, Maybelline argued that purchasers were unlikely to have documentary proof of purchase of products like these years later, and Maybelline does not maintain a purchaser list or other identifying method. In such a situation, the Court and the parties would necessarily rely on class members to self-identify. There are a number of cases that stand for the proposition that where a court has no way to verify if a purchaser is actually a class member, class certification may be improper. See e.g., Red, 2012 WL 8019257, at *4;  Hodes v. Int’l Foods, 2009 WL 2424214, at
*4 (C.D. Cal. July 23, 2009). Here, the relevant purchase was not a memorable “big ticket” item, but rather small-ticket items that cost around $10.00; it was extremely unlikely the average purchaser would even remember she purchased the specific SuperStay products versus a competitor product.

The court also observed that expert evidence shows that materiality and reliance varied from consumer to consumer, such that these elements were not an issue subject to common proof. Under the claims alleged, a representation is considered material if it induced the consumer to alter his position to his detriment. If the issue of materiality or reliance is a matter that would vary from consumer to consumer, the issue is not subject to common proof, and the action is properly not certified as a class action. Maybelline introduced evidence of who the reasonable consumer in the target audience was and what drives her in making purchasing decisions. With cosmetics such as the ones at issue here, customers can readily discern how well they work and whether they lived up to the claimed representations. Accordingly, repeat purchasers can not be considered injured in the manner proposed by Plaintiffs. A repeat purchase indicates satisfaction. The evidence suggested that duration was not the only motivating factor in making the purchases; actual duration expectations varied widely among purchasers; and very few consumers actually read the package the way plaintiffs' counsel did and thus could have been “injured” in the manner alleged by Plaintiffs.

This undermined both the commonality and the typicality prerequisites. Based upon the evidence presented, the named Plaintiffs’ reliance on the alleged misrepresentations was not typical of other class members.

Under Rule 23(b)(2), the court concluded that the injunctive relief requested by the plaintiffs wasn't appropriate for the class as a whole. Class members who bought the cosmetics and used them became well aware of the realities of the products, and wouldn't benefit from the relief sought.

Under Rule 23(b)(3), the Plaintiffs sought individual monetized relief that would require an assessment of each class member's claim based on purchase history.  Given the number of individual purchasing inquiries, as well as the evidence showing materiality and reliance varied from consumer to consumer, it was evident that common issues did not predominate.  As is standard, Plaintiffs proposed the “price premium” method of determining class-wide damages, contending  that their damage theory was “simple."  It was not obvious to the Court, however, that the alleged 24 hour/no transfer claim commanded the alleged premium of $1.00-$3.00. Indeed, that was pure speculation on the part of Plaintiffs. Pricing could have been equally impacted by a higher quality of ingredients, the selection of colors offered, or the unique costs Maybelline expended in the research and development of these products. Plaintiffs’ method of using comparable products from other sellers is inconsistent with the law. To establish that any difference in price was attributed  to the alleged misrepresentation, the Court needed to compare a product, exactly the same but without the challenged marketing claim. Such a task was nearly impossible as no two products are completely identical.

Moreover, Maybelline did not sell retail and does not set retail prices. Establishing a higher price for a comparable product would be difficult where prices in the retail market differ and are affected by the nature and location of the outlet in which they are sold and/or the use of promotions and coupons. The Court could not simply assume that all retailers throughout California purchase and sell the products at one price. 

Finally, the existence of an economic injury was also not a common question as many purchasers were satisfied with the products. Economic injury is not a common question when many purchasers find the class products were worth the amount paid and fully satisfied.

Class motion denied.

Ice Cream Class Action Melts

Happy New Year to all our readers. Let's start 2014 with a delicious class action decision, a Late night snack for our readers.

A California court recently rejected a proposed statewide class in a suit accusing Ben & Jerry's Homemade Inc. of falsely advertising ice cream products as “all-natural.”  See Astiana v. Ben & Jerry’s Homemade Inc., No. 4:10-cv-04387 (N.D. Cal., 1/7/14).  Yes, we are starting off the year right where we left off, another all natural complaint.

Readers probably know that with a $5 correspondence course from Penn State in making ice cream, two regular guys named Ben and Jerry opened their first ice cream scoop shop in Burlington, Vermont, in 1978. 

Here, plaintiffs claimed that both the packaging and the advertising for the Ben & Jerry's ice cream products were deceptive and misleading to the extent that the cocoa in some of them was allegedly alkalized with a "synthetic" agent. Plaintiff filed the complaint in this action in 2010, alleging six causes of action – "unlawful business practices" in violation of Business & Professions Code § 17200; "unfair business practices" in violation of § 17200; "fraudulent business practices" in violation of § 17200; false advertising, in violation of Business & Professions Code § 17500; restitution based on quasi-contract/unjust enrichment; and common law fraud.  Everything but the ...pretty typical in these kinds of label attacks.

The parties originally reached a tentative settlement, which fell apart because of cy pres problems and S'mores issues regarding settlement distribution procedures.

Eventually, plaintiffs moved for class certification. Before certifying a class, the trial court must conduct a rigorous analysis to determine whether the party seeking certification has met the prerequisites of Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 23. Mazza v. American Honda Motor Co., Inc., 666 F.3d 581, 588 (9th Cir. 2012). The party seeking class certification must affirmatively demonstrate that the class meets the requirements of Rule 23. See Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. v. Dukes, 131 S.Ct. 2541, 2551 (2011); see also Gen'l Tel. Co. of Southwest v. Falcon, 457 U.S. 147, 156 (1982).  As a threshold matter, and apart from the explicit requirements of Rule 23, the party seeking class certification must also demonstrate that an identifiable and ascertainable class exists. Mazur v. eBay Inc., 257 F.R.D. 563, 567 (N.D. Cal. 2009).

The court here found that the motion must be denied, for two primary reasons – plaintiff had not established that the class was ascertainable, and she had not established that common issues predominated over individual issues.

While there is no explicit requirement concerning the class definition in Rule 23, courts have held that the class must be adequately defined and clearly ascertainable before a class action may proceed. See Xavier v. Philip Morris USA Inc., 787 F.Supp. 2d 1075, 1089 (N.D. Cal. 2011); Schwartz v. Upper Deck Co., 183 F.R.D. 672, 679-80 (S.D. Cal. 1999). A class definition need not be Berry, berry extraordinary, but should be precise, objective and presently ascertainable. See Rodriguez v. Gates, 2002 WL 1162675 at *8 (C.D. Cal. May 30, 2002). That is, the class definition must be sufficiently definite so that it is administratively feasible to determine whether a particular person is a class member. See Xavier, 787 F.Supp. 2d at 1089.

Defendant contended that because cocoa can be alkalized using one of several alkalis – some of which are "natural" and some of which are allegedly "non-natural" (i.e., "synthetic") – it would be necessary to determine which class members bought an ice cream containing alkalized cocoa processed with a synthetic ingredient.  However, there was no way to identify which class members bought which type of ice cream, particularly given that Ben & Jerry's is a wholesale manufacturer that does not maintain records identifying the ultimate customers or their purchases. What a cluster it would be.

The district court agreed with the defendant that the class was not sufficiently ascertainable. The class was defined as persons who bought Ben & Jerry's labeled "all natural" which contained alkalized cocoa processed with a synthetic ingredient. However, plaintiffs provided no evidence as to which ice cream contained the allegedly "synthetic ingredient" (assuming that alkali can even be considered an "ingredient"). More importantly, plaintiffs had not shown that a means exists for identifying the alkali in every class member's ice cream purchases. The packaging labels said only "processed with alkali," because that is all the FDA required.

A second basis for rejecting the class was the predominance requirement. This inquiry requires the weighing of the common questions in the case against the individualized questions, and the predominance analysis under Rule 23(b)(3) can be more stringent than the commonality requirement of Rule 23(a)(2).  Rule 23(b)(3) focuses on the relationship between the common and individual issues. The inquiry is rigorous as it tests whether proposed class is sufficiently cohesive to warrant adjudication by representation. See AmChem Prods., 521 U.S. at 623-24. 

Defendant asserted that reliance, materiality, and causation were all inherently individual; for example, its experts established that consumer choice is affected by many different factors, and plaintiff had no evidence to show that "all natural" has any uniform meaning or that it would have any major impact on a consumer's decision to purchase (or not to purchase) a particular brand of ice cream. Defendant also contended that the likelihood of confusion from the label must be "probable," not just "possible," and that studies showed that at most 3% of consumers who saw "all natural" on the packaging expected that the alkali used to process the cocoa was "natural."

Defendant similarly argued that the only way to test materiality and reliance would be to determine how much each consumer would have de-valued the ice cream products given the alleged presence of the "synthetic" alkalizing agent. However, this also could not be done on a class-wide basis, because consumer choice is affected by myriad factors. 

Most importantly, the damages claim was Half-baked, as the evidence showed that no one paid a premium for the "all natural" Ben & Jerry's ice cream, as Ben & Jerry's charges its wholesale customers the same price regardless of flavor and regardless of the contents of the label. When Ben & Jerry's changed its label and removed the "all natural" label from some ice cream packages, the prices did not decrease (neither the wholesale nor the retail prices);  so there was no support for plaintiff's speculation that "all natural" ice creams command a premium.

The Court agreed. Whichever way one approached it, plaintiff had not met her burden of showing that there was a class-wide method of awarding relief that was consistent with her theory of deceptive and fraudulent business practices, false advertising, or common law fraud (or the alternative theory of restitution based on quasi-contract). Plaintiff had not offered any expert testimony demonstrating that the market price of Ben & Jerry's ice cream with the "all natural" designation was higher than the market price of Ben & Jerry's without the "all natural" designation. More importantly, plaintiff had not offered sufficient expert testimony demonstrating a gap between the market price of Ben & Jerry's "all natural" ice cream and the price it purportedly should have sold for if it had not been labeled "all natural" – or evidence demonstrating that consumers would be willing to pay a premium for "all natural" ice cream that was made with cocoa alkalized with a "natural" alkali, and did in fact pay such a premium.

Under Comcast, the plaintiff is required to provide evidentiary proof showing a class-wide method of awarding relief that is consistent with plaintiff's theory of liability. See 133 S.Ct. at 1432. Here, however, plaintiff provided no such damages evidence, and the failure to offer a damages model that was capable of measurement across the entire class for purposes of Rule 23(b)(3) barred her effort to obtain certification of the class. 

Class of Coffee Purchasers Rejected

Let's continue on our recent focus on some interesting class action decisions. A federal court recently rejected a proposed class of coffee product purchasers.  See McManus v. Sturm Foods Inc., No. 3:11-cv-00565 (S.D. Ill., 8/26/13).

Plaintiffs claimed that defendants violated the consumer protection statutes and unjust enrichment laws of the eight states with regard to their Grove Square Coffee single serving coffee product.  Per the amended complaint, defendants allegedly misrepresented and omitted the true nature of Grove Square Coffee products by indicating the product contained fresh ground coffee and a filter rather than “instant” or “soluble” coffee.

In considering a motion for class certification, the court looked to the implicit, foundational prerequisites. A court must first ensure that the class is sufficiently “defined.” Jamie S. v. Milwaukee Public Schools, 688 F.3d. 481, 493 (7th Cir. 2012) (“a class must be sufficiently definite"). The class should be “ascertainable,” which it is if the court can  determine membership with objective criteria. A class is, on the other hand, overbroad if it sweeps in a great number of members who “for some reason could not have been harmed by the defendant’s allegedly unlawful conduct.” Messner, 669 F.3d 802 at 824; Kohen v. Pacific Inv. Management Co. LLC, 571 F.3d 672, 677 ( 7th Cir. 2009) (“a class should not be certified if it is apparent that it contains a great many persons who have suffered no injury at the hands of the defendant.”); Oshana v. Coca-Cola Co., 472 F.3d 506, 514 (7th Cir. 2006) (denying class certification when “[c]ountless members of Oshana’s putative class could not show any damage, let alone damage proximately caused by the alleged deception.”). A class is overbroad if it sweeps in many members who could not have been harmed at all: This distinction is critical for class certification purposes. If a proposed class consists largely (or entirely, for that matter) of members who are ultimately shown to have suffered no harm, that may not mean that the class was improperly certified but only that the class failed to meet its burden of proof on the merits. If, however, a class is defined so broadly as to include a great number of members who for some reason could not have been harmed by the defendant’s allegedly unlawful conduct, the class is defined too broadly to permit certification.  A class cannot, then, include numerous people who have no claim at all, observed the court.

The court here found that under any of the relevant the state consumer protection laws requiring causation or actual reliance, the plaintiffs’ class definitions were overbroad. The class definition included all individuals who purchased a Grove Square Coffee product. This definition necessarily includes purchasers who knew, or who were indifferent to the product’s alleged insoluble coffee content. For those purchasers, plaintiffs cannot prove causation, reliance, or actual injury from defendants’ alleged misrepresentation. For this reason, plaintiffs’ claims under Alabama, New York, New Jersey, North Carolina, Illinois, and South Carolina were overbroad and improper for class certification.

Turning to the remaining states, the court engaged in a specific analysis of the state law.  For example, to the extent a state requires plaintiffs to prove an actual loss, but would allow a class-wide presumption of actual loss if the defendant’s alleged misrepresentations were material and made to the entire class, the definition still ran into problems,  In California, said the court, an inference of reliance may be established on a class wide basis with a showing of materiality.  Materiality is objective and exists if a reasonable person would attach importance to the misrepresentation’s existence or nonexistence in determining his choice of action in the transaction in question. However, the inference of reliance is only appropriate if all purported class members were exposed to the alleged misleading advertising. Plaintiffs’ proposed class definition here included individuals who were not exposed to
defendants’ alleged misrepresentation; therefore a court could not presume reliance. In 2011, Sturm Foods allegedly changed its label to include the word “instant.” Class members that were exposed to the packaging after this date (nearly 4 million dollars of gross sales; a vast majority of the overall sales during the class period) were not exposed to what plaintiffs claim was defendants’ primary deception. 

Moreover, the record indicates that extensive sales occurred online, and the class as defined by plaintiffs included these online purchasers. Consumers who purchased the product online without ever seeing the packaging or product placement could not have been exposed to the alleged misrepresentation prior to purchase.

Plaintiffs’ amended complaint thus did not contain sufficient evidence of sales such that any presumption of exposure was appropriate. Materiality cannot be presumed and plaintiffs cannot adequately allege actual injury for the California class.

Overall, the class potentially included a great many individuals who bought Grove Square Coffee products because of, or in spite of, knowing that it contained instant coffee;  thus, the class included a great number of individuals who could not prove causation or an ascertainable loss, as required in various states. These individuals suffered no lost value or incurred no out of pocket expenses as a result of the alleged misrepresentation. Since this class definition potentially swept in a great number of individuals that could not show harm resulting from defendant’s conduct, the class definition was fatally overbroad.

Was there any way to cure the deficiency? It must be administratively feasible for the court to determine whether a particular individual is a member of the proposed class. Clay v. American Tobacco Co., 188 F.R.D. 483, 490 (S.D. Ill. 1999). And the administrative burden of using subjective membership criteria obviates the judicial efficiency that is the fundamental motive for class actions. See Milwaukee Public Schools, 668 F.3d 481, 496 (7th Cir. 2012) (denying class certification for indefiniteness when “identifying disabled students who might be eligible for special-education services is a complex, highly individualized task, and cannot be reduced to the application of a set of simple, objective criteria.”); Simer v. Rios, 661 F.2d 655, 669 (7th Cir. 1981) (noting that determining whether potential class members “knew of the existence of the regulation and were
discouraged from applying for [state heating] assistance . . . would be a burden on the court and require a large expenditure of valuable court time.”); Alliance, 565 F.2d at 978 (“In those cases in which class certification has been denied on account of indefiniteness, the primary defect in the class definition has been that membership in the class was contingent on the state of mind of the prospective class members.”).

Here, the only way to avoid over-inclusiveness would have been to impose criteria limiting class
membership to individuals properly captured by the underlying claim. However, any such criteria would necessarily be subjective. Limiting class membership to individuals that were actually exposed to the deceptive packaging or advertisement would be largely subjective and thus improper. See In re Yasmin, 2012 WL 865041, at *16. This court saw no way to limit class membership without an impermissible plaintiff-by-plaintiff subjective inquiry. Plaintiff’s proposed class was inadequate.

Another useful recent decision as courts place proper focus on the implicit requirements of Rule 23 and the no-longer-pro-forma issues of class definition.

Class certification denied.

Third Circuit Issues Opinion on Ascertainability

We have posted before about the potential importance of the implicit requirement under Rule 23 that a class be ascertainable under the definition proposed by plaintiffs.  Earlier this week, the Third Circuit vacated class certification of a class of WeightSmart supplements purchasers on the basis of ascertainability.  See Carrera v. Bayer Corp., No. 12-2621 (3d Cir. 8/21/13).


Last year the Third Circuit had decided Marcus v. BMW of North America, LLC, in which it held “[i]f class members are impossible to identify without extensive and individualized fact-finding or mini-trials, then a class action is inappropriate.” 687 F.3d 583, 593 (3d Cir. 2012). The court explained that if class members cannot be ascertained from a defendant's records, there must be a reliable, administratively feasible alternative; the court cautioned against approving a method that would amount to no more than ascertaining by potential class members' say so. Id. at 594. A plaintiff does not satisfy the ascertainability requirement if individualized fact-finding or mini-trials will be required to prove class membership. Id. at 593. Administrative feasibility means that identifying class members is a manageable process that does not require much, if any, individual factual inquiry.

The court of appeals explained that the ascertainability requirement serves several important objectives. First, it eliminates serious administrative burdens that are incongruous with the efficiencies expected in a class action by insisting on the easy identification of class members. Second, it protects absent class members by facilitating the best notice practicable under Rule 23(c)(2) in a Rule 23(b)(3) action. Third, it protects defendants by ensuring that those persons who will be bound by the final judgment are clearly identifiable. If a class cannot be ascertained in an economical and administratively feasible manner, any significant benefits of a class action are lost.

Accordingly, a trial court should ensure that class members can be identified without extensive and individualized fact-finding or mini-trials, a determination which must be made at the class certification stage.  Class ascertainability is an essential prerequisite of a class action, at least with respect to actions under Rule 23(b)(3). Marcus, 687 F.3d at 592-93. There is „no reason to doubt that the “rigorous analysis” requirement for trial courts considering class certification applies with equal force to all Rule 23 requirements. Accordingly, said the court, a plaintiff must show, by a preponderance of the evidence, that the class is currently and readily ascertainable based on objective criteria, and a trial court must undertake a rigorous analysis of the evidence to determine if the standard is met.

Of great interest to our readers is the court of appeal's analysis of the due process implications of ascertainability. In this case, the ascertainability question was whether each class member purchased WeightSmart in Florida. If this were an individual claim, a plaintiff would have to prove at trial that he purchased WeightSmart. A defendant in a class action has a due process right to raise individual challenges and defenses to claims, and a class action cannot be certified in a way that eviscerates this right or masks individual issues. See McLaughlin v. Am. Tobacco Co., 522 F.3d 215, 231-32 (2d Cir. 2008) (rejecting a “fluid recovery” method of determining individual damages, in which aggregate damages would be based on estimates of the number of defrauded class members and their average loss), abrogated on other grounds by Bridge v. Phoenix Bond & Indem. Co., 553 U.S. 639 (2008); see also Dukes, 131 S. Ct. at 2561 (rejecting a method of class certification in which a sample set of class members would be used to extrapolate average damages). A defendant has a similar, if not the same, due process right to challenge the proof used to demonstrate class membership as it does to challenge the other elements of a plaintiff's claim. To force a defendant to accept as true the absent class members' declarations that they are members of the class, without further indicia of reliability, would have serious due process implications.  Ascertainability thus helps provide a measure of due process by requiring that a defendant be able to test the reliability of the evidence submitted to prove class membership.


Here, Carrera advanced two ways to ascertain the class: first, by retailer records of online sales and sales made with store loyalty or rewards cards; second, by affidavits of class members, attesting they purchased WeightSmart and stating the amount they purchased (despite the fact that in named plaintiff's own deposition testimony, he failed to remember when he purchased WeightSmart and confused it with WeightSmart Advanced and other generic or similar products, none of which are part of this litigation). The Third Circuit concluded this evidence did not satisfy the ascertainability requirement.  There was no evidence that a single purchaser of WeightSmart could be identified using records of customer membership cards or records of online sales. There was no evidence that retailers even have records for the relevant period.  As to the second, this argument failed because it did not address a core concern of ascertainability: that a defendant must be able to challenge class membership. 

Another key feature for our readers relates to plaintiff's claim that because he was proceeding under a state consumer fraud act (Florida's FDUTPA) which allegedly did not require individual proof of reliance, the total amount of damages that defendant would pay (the total sales in the state in the class period) did not change -- only which class member got what amount. Under Carrera's view, if fraudulent or inaccurate claims were paid out, the only harm was to other class members. But ascertainability protects absent class members as well as defendants, said the court, so Carrera's focus on defendant alone was misplaced. It would be unfair to absent class members if there was a significant likelihood their recovery will be diluted by fraudulent or inaccurate claims. In this case, there was the possibility that Carrera's proposed method for ascertaining the class via affidavits would dilute the recovery of true class members.  The defendant still had an interest in ensuring it pays only legitimate claims. If fraudulent or inaccurate claims materially reduce true class members' relief, these class members could argue the named plaintiff did not adequately represent them because he proceeded with the understanding that absent members may get less than full relief. When class members are not adequately represented by the named plaintiff, they potentially are not bound by the judgment.

Thus, the case could be an important precedent for defendants, especially those facing class actions asserting fraud allegations about products for which detailed, accurate receipts likely no longer exist.

Case remanded for further limited discovery on the issue, given the timing of Marcus.


 

Amicus Files Third Circuit Brief on Important Class Issue

One of the things we like to do is flag for our readers interesting arguments raised by amicus on important appeals. The Product Liability Advisory Council recently submitted a brief to the Third Circuit. weighing in on the surprising and troubling certification of a class of consumers in a vitamin case. Carrera v. Bayer Corp. et al., No.12-2621 (3d Cir. 2012).

The implicit requirement of ascertainability is an important but sometimes overlooked prerequisite to class certification. A plaintiff must offer a definition of a class that is precise, objective and presently ascertainable. A threshold requirement to a Rule 23 action is the actual existence of a class which is sufficiently definite and identifiable. See, e.g., Kline v. Sec. Guards, Inc., 196 F.R.D. 261, 266 (E.D. Pa. 2000); Reilly v. Gould, Inc., 965 F. Supp. 588, 596 (M.D. Pa. 1997); Clay v. Am. Tobacco Co., 188 F.R.D. 483 (S.D. Ill. 1999). The initial inquiry on class definition is distinct from the analysis required by Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 23. See, e.g., Sanneman v. Chrysler Corp., 191 F.R.D. 441, 446 n. 8 (E.D. Pa. 2000). This notion means, in part, that the court can see sufficient administrative feasibility in determining whether a particular person belongs to a class -- that the court can identify class members in a practical and non-burdensome manner. A “proposed class must be sufficiently identifiable,” and it must be “administratively feasible to determine whether a given individual is a member of the class.”Mueller v. CBS, Inc., 200 F.R.D. 227, 233 (W.D. Pa. 2001). A class may not be ascertainable if it will require individual inquiry into each class member’s particular situation to determine whether that plaintiff suffered the injury alleged. Similarly, a class is not ascertainable if membership depends on a particular subjective state of mind. And even when plaintiffs offer ostensibly objective criteria for membership, the court must be able to apply that objective criteria to determine who is in the class without addressing numerous fact-intensive questions. Certification is denied when determining membership in the class essentially requires a mini-hearing as to each prospective class member. E.g., Agostino v. Quest Diagnostics Inc., 256 F.R.D. 437, 478 (D.N.J. 2009); Solo v. Bausch & Lomb Inc., 2009 WL 4287706, (D. S.C. Sept. 25, 2009) (class not appropriate for certification where determining class membership would require “fact-intensive mini-trials”).

Here, the trial court certified a class of Florida residents who purchased One-A-Day WeightSmart, a multivitamin that Bayer stopped selling in January 2007 – more than five years ago. As the
experience of the named plaintiff vividly illustrated, PLAC noted, membership in the class could not be demonstrated through objective documentation. Obviously, most consumers do not keep receipts or packaging from small-value, one-use products consumed years ago, and  plaintiff could not substantiate his own purchases (or offer any evidence that anyone else’s purchases could be substantiated).

Instead, noted the amicus, plaintiff proposed to prove class membership – for himself and for
the alleged members of the class – through self-serving statements whose veracity Bayer would have no ability to challenge. As the district court’s brief order described it, plaintiff and the other class members who lack objectively verifiable evidence that they ever purchased WeightSmart could still “establish” class membership by way of “claim forms or affidavits.” The order apparently made no provision for any substantive challenge to these proposed forms or affidavits; rather, the court viewed such submissions as “sufficient” in themselves to “verify claims.”

This one-sided procedure clearly violates a defendant's fundamental right to present individualized defenses, a right that is protected by the Due Process Clause. That right cannot be vitiated merely because the case is a putative class action or because the claims at issue have low dollar values.

Nor is the right to challenge class membership a mere technicality, noted PLAC. The named plaintiff himself had no definitive evidence that he purchased the product at issue in his suit. To the contrary, there was a real question, flagged by PLAC, whether he ever bought WeightSmart, given his erroneous recollection of the product’s packaging and the time period when it was on the market. Other potential class members would face similar challenges in proving that they purchased WeightSmart. Contrary to the district court's view, these were not minor manageability issues that should not prevent certification of a class.  That view, noted PLAC, confused Bayer’s fundamental rights with minor procedural issues that can be disregarded in service of class certification.

PLAC correctly pointed out the real danger in decisions like this: establishing a rule of law that defendants can be held liable to consumers without any real proof that those consumers purchased the defendants’ products, and sending a message that administrative convenience can override the basic due-process right to defend oneself in litigation.


 

Class Certification Denied Under Ascertainability Analysis

We typically focus on appellate decisions regarding class certification, but wanted to note for you a recent lower court federal decision in case involving a proposed class of patients who claim they were implanted with a medical device for treating acid reflux . See Haggart v. Endogastric Solutions Inc., No. 2:10-cv-00346 (W.D.Pa. 6/28/12).


Readers will want to note the discussion of ascertainability. The implicit requirement of ascertainability is an important but sometimes overlooked prerequisite to class certification. A plaintiff must offer a definition of a class that is precise, objective and presently ascertainable. A threshold requirement to a Rule 23 action is the actual existence of a class which is sufficiently definite and identifiable. See, e.g., Kline v. Sec. Guards, Inc., 196 F.R.D. 261, 266 (E.D. Pa. 2000); Reilly v. Gould, Inc., 965 F. Supp. 588, 596 (M.D. Pa. 1997); Clay v. Am. Tobacco Co., 188 F.R.D. 483 (S.D. Ill. 1999). The initial inquiry on class definition is distinct from the analysis required by Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 23. See, e.g., Sanneman v. Chrysler Corp., 191 F.R.D. 441, 446 n. 8 (E.D. Pa. 2000). This notion means, in part, that the court can see sufficient administrative feasibility in determining whether a particular person belongs to a class -- that the court can identify class members in a practical and non-burdensome manner. A “proposed class must be sufficiently identifiable,” and it must be “administratively feasible to determine whether a given individual is a member of the class.”Mueller v. CBS, Inc., 200 F.R.D. 227, 233 (W.D. Pa. 2001). A class may not be ascertainable if it will require individual inquiry into each class member’s particular situation to determine whether that plaintiff suffered the injury alleged. Similarly, a class is not ascertainable if membership depends on a particular subjective state of mind. And even when plaintiffs offer ostensibly objective criteria for membership, the court must be able to apply that objective criteria to determine who is in the class without addressing numerous fact-intensive questions. Certification is denied when determining membership in the class essentially requires a mini-hearing as to each prospective class member. E.g., Agostino v. Quest Diagnostics Inc., 256 F.R.D. 437, 478 (D.N.J. 2009); Solo v. Bausch & Lomb Inc., 2009 WL 4287706, (D. S.C. Sept. 25, 2009) (class not appropriate for certification where determining class membership would require “fact-intensive mini-trials”).
 

Here, plaintiff claimed that defendant had misrepresented implantation of a medical device for treatment of acid reflux — describing it as “reversible” rather than “revisable.”  Plaintiff offered one class definition as “all individuals who have undergone the [procedure] . . . and who have relied upon representations” related to its reversibility and/or revisability,  This, the court said, was "simply a non-starter."  The determination of class membership under this definition would require the court to adjudicate on a person-by-person basis whether each proposed class member relied on defendant’s representations. That is, class membership would not be ascertainable without the imposition of serious administrative burdens incongruous with the efficiencies expected in a class action.

Plaintiff then went to an alternate class defined as “all individuals who have undergone the EsophyX procedure in the United States since September 24, 2007.” But this very broad proposed class failed the typicality requirement owing to marked differences as to information received and relied upon, the legal theory underlying plaintiff’s claims, and other factors.  Specifically, there would be numerous, inevitable questions regarding the information received by individual patients - from their physicians or other sources - and their reliance on particular representations. While named plaintiff was unhappy, plaintiff conceded that most patients undergoing an EsophyX procedure have had a successful result.  Putative class members received information regarding the procedure primarily from their physicians, which information likely varied for reasons related to both the physicians themselves and the individual patient’s medical circumstances; the amount and content of information received by a patient directly from defendant’s marketing or other materials likely differed from plaintiff’s and as between putative class members as well; and individual decisions to undergo the procedure were likely influenced by and premised on varying individual considerations -- all of which also undercut predominance.

Motion for class certification denied.

Federal Court Dismisses Proposed Television Consumer Fraud Class Action

Here's a case of a venerable rule (puffery) and an important new doctrine (Twiqbal) being applied in the context of a troubling trend -- the spate of consumer fraud class actions challenging everything a defendant says about its products.  A New Jersey federal court recently rejected a putative class action alleging that Panasonic Corp. falsely advertised its Viera plasma televisions made in 2008 and 2009. Shane Robert Hughes et al. v. Panasonic Consumer Electronics Co., No. 2:10-cv-00846 (D.N.J. July 21, 2011). A useful and detailed analysis of commonly found flaws in consumer fraud class action complaints.

Plaintiffs putatively represented a class defined as individuals and entities who own or purchased any 2008/2009 model Panasonic Viera Plasma Television. Plaintiffs alleged that the televisions suffered from increased “voltage adjustments” causing a rapid deterioration in picture quality. The  class members allegedly relied on Panasonic’s representations concerning the "industry leading" black levels and contrast ratios, and/or personally observed the televisions’ excellent picture quality on models displayed in retail stores. Plaintiffs sought damages and/or refunds from Panasonic for violations of the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act (“NJCFA”), N.J. STAT. ANN. § 56:8-1 et seq.; other states’ consumer protection acts; and under various express and implied warranty claims.

Defendant moved to dismiss. The adequacy of pleadings is governed by Fed. R. Civ. P. 8(a)(2), which requires that a complaint allege “a short and plain statement of the claim showing that the pleader is entitled to relief,” but also requires more than labels and conclusions, and a formulaic recitation of the elements of a cause of action will not do. Factual allegations must be enough to raise a right to relief above the speculative level. Bell Atlantic Corp. v. Twombly, 550 U.S. 544, 555 (2007).

Although class members were from around the country, the court determined it need not decide whether it was appropriate to engage in a choice of law analysis at the pleadings stage because, as detailed below, each of the plaintiffs’ claims failed as a matter of law under any of the possibly applicable laws.

Claims under the NJCFA and most state consumer fraud acts require a plaintiff to allege (1) unlawful conduct by the defendants; (2) an ascertainable loss on the part of the plaintiff; and (3) a causal relationship between the defendants’ unlawful conduct and the plaintiff’s ascertainable loss.  Panasonic argued, among other things, that even if the allegations are true, plaintiffs’ CFA claim failed because plaintiffs had not pointed to any actionable unlawful conduct by Panasonic. According to Panasonic, plaintiffs did not set forth any specific advertisements, marketing materials, warranties, or product guides that plaintiffs viewed; where and from whom at Panasonic did plaintiffs received any such information; or how precisely, plaintiffs were injured by any such representations.

The Court found that Panasonic’s alleged misrepresentations about the Televisions’
“industry  leading” technology and features, which create superior image and color quality, were not “statements of fact,” but rather subjective expressions of opinion. Indeed, such statements of
product superiority are routinely made by companies in advertising to gain a competitive advantage
in the industry. The NJCFA distinguishes between actionable misrepresentations of fact and
"puffery.” Rodio v. Smith, 123 N.J. 345, 352 (1991) (the slogan “You’re in good hands with Allstate” was “nothing more than puffery” and as such was not “a deception, false promise, misrepresentation, or any other unlawful practice within the ambit of the Consumer Fraud Act”); see New Jersey Citizen Action v. Schering-Plough Corp., 367 N.J. Super. 8, 13-14 (N.J. Super. App. Div. 2003) (finding that defendant’s advertisements which employed phrases as “you . . . can lead a normal nearly symptom-free life again” were “not statements of fact, but are merely expressions in the nature of puffery and thus were not actionable” under the NJCFA).  The same is true in many states.

The remaining misrepresentations may have been statements of fact rather than mere puffery. However, plaintiffs did not assert sufficient allegations of fact to satisfy the requisite level of adequate pleading under Rule 9(b) or by Twombly/Iqbal.  For example, regarding the alleged misrepresentation about half-brightness, the Amended Complaint did not allege the date, place or time of this misrepresentation or otherwise inject some precision and some measure of substantiation into plaintiffs’ allegations of fraud. While plaintiffs could not be expected to plead facts solely within Panasonic’s knowledge or control, plaintiffs should be able to allege the specific advertisements, marketing materials, warranties or product guides that they each reviewed, which included this misrepresentation and when it was so advertised.

Plaintiffs also alleged various omissions, but fraudulent omissions require a showing of intent. Here, even accepting the allegations of omissions in the Amended Complaint as true, the court found that plaintiffs failed to allege sufficient facts to raise any plausible inference that Panasonic knowingly concealed the alleged defect with the intent that consumers and industry experts would rely upon the concealment. Indeed, throughout the Amended Complaint, it was alleged that Panasonic knew “or should have known” of the defect, but provides no additional facts explaining how or why Panasonic had knowledge of the defect to satisfy Twombly/Iqbal. Such allegations of intentionally failing to disclose the alleged defect were merely conclusory assertions.

Even assuming plaintiffs sufficiently alleged the “unlawful conduct” element under the consumer fraud acts, the court also concluded that the Amended Complaint did not satisfy the pleading requirements of Twombly/Iqbal or Rule 9(b) as to the “ascertainable loss” element.  A plaintiff must suffer a definite, certain and measurable loss, rather than one that is merely theoretical. The certainty implicit in the concept of an ascertainable loss is that it is quantifiable or measurable. The allegations did not sufficiently plead either an out-of pocket loss by plaintiffs or a showing of loss in value. For example. plaintiffs failed to allege how much they paid for their Televisions and how much other comparable Televisions manufactured by Panasonic’s competitors cost at the time.  Plaintiffs failed to allege how much of a premium they claim to have paid for their Panasonic Televisions.  Furthermore, in the Amended Complaint, plaintiffs affirmatively stated that most continue to use the Televisions, thus obscuring any possible measurable loss.  Typically, plaintiffs try not to allege details in this area for fear of undermining their class certification arguments.

Plaintiffs' warranty claim suffered from several defects. While the claim at times was presented as an alleged manufacturing problem, a review of the Amended Complaint revealed that plaintiffs alleged only that the Televisions suffered from an inherent design defect and/or improper programming. Plaintiffs one vague, conclusory allegation that the defect was caused, in part, due to “manufacturing errors” was insufficient to satisfy the requisite pleading standards under Twombly/Iqbal.  Moreover, the express warranty claims were impacted by what the court already concluded in connection with plaintiffs’ consumer fraud claims, that Panasonic’s statements about the Televisions’ “industry leading” technology and features, which create superior image and color quality, were mere expressions of puffery. As such, these marketing statements were not sufficient enough to create an express warranty. 

On the implied warranty claim, while plaintiffs alleged that the Televisions were defective, plaintiffs did not allege that the Televisions were inoperable or otherwise not in working condition. Indeed, the Amended Complaint did not contain any explicit allegation that plaintiffs could no longer use their Televisions - in other words, that they were no longer generally fit for their ordinary purpose.  Although the Televisions may not have fulfilled plaintiffs’ subjective expectations, plaintiffs did not adequately allege that the Televisions failed to provide a minimum level of quality, which is all that the law of implied warranty requires. See also In re Ford Motor Co. Ignition Switch Prods. Liab. Litig., 2001 WL 1266317, at *22 (D.N.J. Sept. 30, 1997) (merchantability “does not entail a promise by the merchant that the goods are exactly as the buyer expected, but rather that the goods satisfy a minimum level of quality”).

Thus, the court concluded, each of plaintiffs’ claims failed to state a claim under Rule 12(b)(6), to satisfy Rule 9(b) heightened pleading requirements, and/or pleading standards under
Twombly/Iqbal. The court granted Panasonic’s motion to dismiss the Amended Complaint without prejudice.

Federal Court Dismisses Soda Misrepresentation Claim

A New Jersey federal recently dismissed a putative class action accusing The Coca-Cola Co. of misleading consumers about the health value of the carbonated beverage Diet Coke Plus.  Mason et al. v. The Coca-Cola Co., No. 09-cv-00220 (D.N.J. 3/31/11).

This is another in the series of cases we have warned readers about: plaintiffs are not injured, are not at risk of injury, have gotten the benefit of their bargain, but claim they were somehow duped by marketing. Here, plaintiffs alleged that they “were persuaded to purchase the product because the term ‘Plus’ and the language ‘Diet Coke with Vitamins and Minerals’ suggested to consumers that the product was healthy and contained nutritional value,” when it allegedly did not.

Defendants moved to dismiss under the Twombly/Iqbal doctrine.  Of course, claims alleging fraud or mistake must also meet the heightened pleading requirements of Fed. R. Civ. P. 9(b), which requires such claims to be pled with “particularity.”

To state a claim under the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act., a plaintiff must allege: “(1) unlawful conduct by the defendants; (2) an ascertainable loss on the part of the plaintiff; and (3) a causal relationship between the defendants’ unlawful conduct and the plaintiff’s ascertainable loss.” Frederico v. Home Depot, 507 F.3d 188, 202 (3d Cir. 2007). Plaintiffs claimed that defendant committed affirmative acts of fraud and deception, and that they were persuaded to purchase the product because the term ‘Plus’ and the language ‘Diet Coke with Vitamins and Minerals’ somehow suggested to consumers that the product was healthy and contained extra nutritional value.

However, the FDA's warning letter about the product attached by plaintiffs to their own complaint shows that it is not false that Diet Coke Plus contains vitamins and minerals.  Plaintiffs failed to allege with particularity what further expectations beyond these ingredients they had for the product or how it fell short of those expectations. Plaintiffs simply made a broad assumption that defendant somehow intended for Diet Coke Plus’s vitamin and mineral content to deceive plaintiffs into thinking that the beverage was really “healthy.”  Without more specificity as to how defendant made false or deceptive statements to plaintiffs regarding the healthiness or nutritional value of the soda, the court found that plaintiffs failed to plead the “affirmative act” element with sufficient particularity to state a viable NJCFA claim.

Plaintiffs also failed to plead an ascertainable loss. When plaintiffs purchased Diet Coke Plus, they received a beverage that contained the exact ingredients listed on its label. Plaintiffs could not explain how they experienced any out-of-pocket loss because of their purchases, or that the soda they bought was worth an amount of money less than the soda they consumed. Mere subjective  dissatisfaction with a product is not a quantifiable loss that can be remedied under the NJCFA.  The same defects doomed the common law misrepresentation claims.

Although the FDA had issued the warning letter (on a somewhat arcane and technical issue), the court noted that not every regulatory violation amounts to an act of consumer fraud. The court also noted that it is simply not plausible that consumers would be aware of FDA regulations regarding “nutrient content” and restrictions on the enhancement of snack foods. The complaint actually did not allege that consumers bought the product because they knew of and attributed something meaningful to the regulatory term “Plus” and therefore relied on it. Rather, plaintiffs alleged merely that they subjectively thought they were buying a “healthy” product that happened to also apparently run afoul of a technical FDA regulation.

Snapple The Best Stuff in Court - Consumer Class Action Denied

Earlier this month a trial court in New York denied class certification purchaser of Snapple beverages who complained that drinks labeled “All Natural” are somehow misleading because they contain high fructose corn syrup.  See Weiner v. Snapple Beverage Corp., (S.D.N.Y. 8/3/10).

Off and on, we have commented on the growing and alarming trend for plaintiffs lawyers to concoct consumer fraud class action claims against products, even when consumers were not injured and got basically what they paid for, because of some alleged ambiguity in the label or old-fashioned puffing.

Snapple Beverage Corporation was founded in New York’s Greenwich Village in 1972. Snapple began selling and marketing its teas and juice drinks in the late 1980s. In marketing its beverages, Snapple focused on, among other things, flavor, innovation, and humor. Snapple became known for its quirky personality and funny advertising, as well as its colorful product labels and beverage names. For instance, Snapple’s television advertisements featured, among other things, Snapple bottles dressed in wigs and hats, singing in a Backstreet-esque “boy-band,” running with the bulls (hamsters with cardboard horns) in Spain, and performing synchronized swimming.

When Snapple entered the beverages market in the late 1980s, it avoided putting preservatives, which were then commonly found in some similar beverages, in its teas and juice drinks. Snapple was able to do so by using a “hot-fill” process, which uses high-temperature heat pasteurization to preserve products immediately before bottling. Snapple also used 16-ounce glass bottles instead of aluminum cans or plastic. Hence the term on their label "All Natural."

From their inception, Snapple’s beverages were sweetened with high fructose corn syrup.  HFCS is made from corn ( a natural product last time we checked), and its primary constituents are glucose and fructose, the sugars that comprise table sugar and honey (which also sound pretty natural). It is undisputed that Snapple disclosed the inclusion of HFCS in the ingredient list that appears on the label of every bottle of Snapple that was labeled “All Natural.”

But plaintiffs alleged that they paid a price premium for Snapple beverages as a result of the “All Natural” labeling, and that Snapple’s “All Natural” labeling was misleading because Snapple had HFCS.  They brought a class action on behalf of all people who purchased Snapple in New York.  The FDA is reportedly looking at whether high fructose corn syrup may be considered a natural ingredient, but the court didn't need that guidance to dispose of this bogus class claim.

The court focused on the Rule 23(b)(3) predominance inquiry which tests whether proposed classes are sufficiently cohesive to warrant adjudication by representation. The predominance requirement is met only if the plaintiff can establish that the issues in the class action that are subject to generalized proof, and thus applicable to the class as a whole, predominate over those issues that are subject only to individualized proof.  The issues in turn are determined by the causes of action and defenses to them.  Plaintiffs' main claim was for alleged deceptive acts or practices in the conduct of any business, trade or commerce under N.Y. Gen. Bus. L. § 349. Generally, claims under § 349 are available to an individual consumer who falls victim to misrepresentations made by a seller of consumer goods through false or misleading advertising.

New York's § 349 does not require proof of actual reliance. But the plaintiff must show that the defendant’s material deceptive act caused the injury. In addition, a plaintiff must prove actual injury to recover under the statute.  The court noted that proof of actual injury in this case is bound up in proof of damages, or by how much plaintiffs have been harmed. Only by showing that plaintiffs in fact paid more for Snapple beverages as a result of Snapple’s “All Natural” labeling could plaintiffs establish the requisite elements of causation and actual injury under § 349.

The court concluded that plaintiffs had not proposed a suitable methodology for establishing the critical elements of causation and injury on a class-wide basis. Without a reliable methodology, plaintiffs had not shown that they could prove at trial using common evidence that putative class members in fact paid a premium for the beverage. Because individualized inquiries as to causation, injury, and damages for each of the millions of putative class members would  predominate over any issues of law or fact common to the class, plaintiffs’ § 349 claim could not be certified under Rule 23(b)(3).

In support of their contention that causation and injury were susceptible to generalized proof on a class-wide basis, plaintiffs relied on the expert report of Dr. Alan Goedde, an economist.  In his report, Goedde proposed two “approaches” for determining the purported price premium attributable to Snapple’s “All Natural” labeling: (1) a “yardstick” approach, which would use “class-wide economic data and standard economic methodologies” to “compare the price of products labeled ‘All Natural’ to similar products which do not have ‘All Natural’ labeling;” and (2) an “inherent value”  approach, which would analyze unspecified “studies and market research” to gather “data that can be used to determine the increased value, standing alone, that a product realizes due to the perception of that product being natural.”

The court found Goedde’s testimony unreliable. The witness did not demonstrate in adequate detail how his proposed “approaches” would be used to develop an empirical algorithm to determine, on a class-wide basis, whether there was a price premium as a result of Snapple’s “All Natural” labeling and, if so, how such a premium could be quantified. For example, he did not identify the products to which Snapple should be compared. He did not explain how his approach would isolate the impact of the “All Natural” labeling from the other factors that purportedly affect the price of Snapple and its competitors. He failed to take into account that there was no uniform price for Snapple beverages during the class period, and thus did not explain how his approach would account for the various prices that putative class members actually paid in determining injury
on a class-wide basis.

Goedde relied on two internal Snapple marketing strategy documents to support his alternate hypothesis that Snapple’s “All Natural” label allowed it to command a premium in the marketplace. Yet he did not review the deposition transcripts of Snapple’s witnesses or any of the other  documents produced by Snapple, which would have provided critical context for these documents.

The court accurately spotlighted the common plaintiff tactic in these kinds of cases: the failure to
invest sufficient time and effort to develop a reliable methodology to support an expert opinion at the class certification stage.  Although the court thought plaintiffs correct in arguing that Goedde need not “implement” or fully “test” his methodology at the class certification stage, an expert must still provide sufficient detail about the proposed methodology to permit a court to determine whether the methodology is suitable to the task at hand.

Without Goedde’s testimony, plaintiffs offered no evidence that a suitable methodology is available to prove the elements of causation and actual injury on a class-wide basis. Individualized inquiries would therefore be required in order to determine whether class members in fact paid a premium for Snapple beverages, and whether any such premium was attributable to the “All Natural” labeling. This would require, among other things, an examination of each of the millions of class members’ Snapple purchases, which the evidence showed were made in different locations, at different times, and for different prices, over the nearly eight-year class period.

One further issue of note is class definition.  The court found that plaintiffs failed to show how the potentially millions of putative class members could be ascertained using objective criteria that were administratively feasible. Plaintiffs - typically  - suggested that after certification, the court could require simply that class members produce a receipt, offer a product label, or even sign a declaration to confirm that the individual had purchased a Snapple beverage within the class period. The court labeled this suggestion "unrealistic." Plaintiffs offered no basis to assume that putative class members retained a receipt, bottle label, or any other concrete documentation of their purchases of Snapple beverages bearing the “All Natural” description.  Indeed, putative class members were unlikely to remember accurately every Snapple purchase during the class period, much less whether it was an “All Natural” or diet beverage, whether it was purchased as a single bottle or part of a six-pack or case, whether they used a coupon, or what price they paid. Soliciting declarations from putative class members regarding their history of Snapple purchases would invite them "to speculate, or worse."

However beloved Snapple may be, said the court,  there is no evidence to suggest that its consumers treat it like a fine wine and remove and save its labels.