Group Demands Regulation Of Energy Drinks

A group of scientists and physicians have petitioned the Food and Drug Administration asking for more regulation of popular energy drinks, because their caffeine content. The group contends the ingredient puts drinkers at possible risk for caffeine intoxication and other ailments. The letter was written by Dr. Roland Griffiths, of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

The United States is the world's largest consumer by volume of energy drinks, roughly 290 million gallons in 2007. That works out to about 3.8 quarts per person per year. The U.S. market for the drinks is estimated at $5.4 billion. Pretty much any successful product these days is likely to become a target of plaintiffs’ attorneys or Big Brother regulations designed to prevent people from making voluntary choices and excusing them from taking responsibility for their choices.
Caffeine is found in coffee beans, tea leaves, cocoa beans and other plants. Caffeine is an ingredient that consumers have enjoyed in many drinks for more than 100 years. The beverage industry offers both caffeine-free and caffeinated drinks. And customers are free to choose their drink of choice, whether caffeinated or non-caffeinated.

Caffeine is one of the most comprehensively studied ingredients in the food supply, with centuries of safe consumption in foods and beverages. In 1959, the FDA designated caffeine in cola drinks as "Generally Recognized As Safe" (GRAS). The FDA considers caffeine safe for all consumers, including children. In 1987, following extensive review, the FDA "found no evidence to show that the use of caffeine in carbonated beverages would render these products injurious to health." More than 140 countries have specifically considered the safety of caffeine and allow its use in beverages at various levels.

Red Bull, the best-selling energy drink in the USA, contains 80 milligrams of caffeine per 8.3-ounce can, about the equivalent of a cup of coffee. The "pick me up" quality long associated with many drinks reflects a complex mix of ingredients, including caffeine. The bitter taste of caffeine also adds to the complex overall flavor profile of soft drinks.
 

Consumers can easily find out how much caffeine is in a beverage by calling a company's 1-800 number or visiting its website for those drinks that don't list content on their labels. As with all foods and beverages, parents should use common sense in deciding whether to give their children caffeinated foods and beverages, and how much. That’s a parent’s job, not the government’s.
In the most recent version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, caffeine is specifically excluded from the category of substances classified as causing "substance dependence." Unlike drugs of abuse, people who choose to consume foods and beverages that contain caffeine can control or moderate their caffeine intake. Scientific studies confirm that although many people enjoy caffeinated products, those who choose to stop consuming or reduce caffeine in their diets can do so without difficulty.