Mass Tort Defense

Amicus Weighs In On Daubert Issue in Court of Appeals

The Product Liability Advisory Council weighed in as amicus earlier this month, asking the Eleventh Circuit to reverse a district court ruling that had allowed unreliable expert testimony in a case involving Jet Skis. See Megan Sands v. Kawasaki Motors Corp. U.S.A. et al., No.12-14667 (11th Cir.).

The PLAC brief  is part of the litigation arising from a complaint originally filed in Florida in 2007 by Georgia college student Megan Sands, who was riding as a passenger on a Kawasaki 2003 Ultra 150 Jet Ski in the Bahamas when she was thrown backward from her seat into the water.  She alleged this caused her to suffer severe, extensive and permanent damage to her lower extremities. Sands alleged that the device was defective because it did not have either a raised seat back or a “sissy bar” to prevent passengers from falling backward, or a kill switch that would allow an ejected passenger to cut off the engine.The case went to trial, resulting in a favorable verdict for Kawasaki on strict liability and negligent failure to warn claims but a finding in favor of Sands on design defect claims. Defendant appealed.

The amicus brief focused on the trial court's gate-keeping obligations under the Daubert standard, and the testimony of plaintiff's expert Burleson concerning an alternative seat design for the jet ski. PLAC argued that he presented no testing or engineering analysis to show that the alternative design would have improved the overall safety and utility of the product. Instead, his opinion rested
solely on an unsupported, conclusory statement in his report, which was precisely the kind of "analytical leap" and ipse dixit condemned in prior cases.  Kawasaki did not challenge the
admissibility of Burleson's assertion that his seat back concept, if used, might have eliminated or reduced the risk of injury to this plaintiff. Rather, as Kawasaki had argued below, Burleson had not tested whether a seatback would pose other dangers of equal or greater magnitude to the danger it would supposedly address.

The trial court appeared to describe the issue merely as whether "adequate testing" was conducted, but the testing evidence was not responsive to the specific objection that Kawasaki had raised. Neither the Plaintiff nor the trial court, said PLAC, ever identified any test or other engineering data supporting Burleson's conclusory assertion about the overall safety of the alternative design.

PLAC also focused on the trial court's statement that it was "unable to say that Mr. Burleson's testimony regarding a fixed seatback is unreliable," which sounded like the court switched the burden to show unreliability to Kawasaki. The absence of an admission by Burleson that the
alternative design would introduce a risk of other hazards should not have permitted the jury to
conclude that the alternative design was reasonable. Substantive tort law places the burden on the plaintiff to establish that the proposed alternative design would have greater overall safety than the existing design, and procedural law  imposes the burden on the proponent of expert testimony to establish its reliability. PLAC argued that a trial court does not have discretion to switch the burden under Rule 702 from the proponent of expert evidence to the opponent of such evidence. 

One to keep an eye on.

 

Trackbacks (0) Links to blogs that reference this article Trackback URL
http://www.masstortdefense.com/admin/trackback/289533
Comments (0) Read through and enter the discussion with the form at the end
Sean P. Wajert of Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP