California's Proposed "Green Chemistry" Regulations Move Forward

California's proposed "green chemistry" regulation took another step closer to completion last week, as the state Department of Toxic Substance Control (DTSC) submitted the draft regulations to begin the final official rulemaking process.  The public has until Nov. 1, 2010 to make comments.  Under state law passed in 2008, the regulations must be finalized before 2011.

As readers know from previous posts, "green chemistry" is the state's effort to require that chemical products be designed in such a way as to reduce the use or generation of hazardous substances and reduce health and environmental risks, with a clear emphasis on finding alternatives to "chemicals of concern."  Two bills passed in 2008 by the legislature mandated that DTSC develop regulations for identifying and prioritizing chemicals of concern, to create methods for analyzing alternatives to existing chemicals, and to create a mechanism for regulatory response, including possible restrictions or bans on certain chemicals.  The laws also created a Green Ribbon Science Panel to advise DTSC, and provided for a Chemical Information Clearinghouse that will make chemical risk information more accessible to the public.

Earlier in 2010, the agency released a draft Safer Consumer Product Alternatives regulation, then held public meetings and workshops and took written comments.  Last week, the final, slightly revised draft, was issued. DTSC’s regulations call for identifying and prioritizing chemicals in consumer products, for conducting an alternatives assessment, and then an appropriate  regulatory response.

The proposed regulations call for creation of a proposed initial list of Chemicals under Consideration by June 1, 2012, and, from that an eventual list of Priority Chemicals by July 1, 2012. Similarly, the agency is to create a proposed initial list of Products under Consideration (because they contain the relevant chemicals) by March 1, 2013, and eventually a final list of Priority Products by December 1, 2013. In making this determination, the regulations offer a long list of relevant factors, including usage, distribution, disposal and life cycle issues, use by sensitive sub-populations, and a host of toxicity parameters.  One thing for manufacturers to watch: it is unclear how the DTSC will weigh and balance these and other factors. Especially important will be the relative emphasis on realistic, feasible exposure scenarios and dose, as opposed to theoretical risks in the lab.  A second area of potential concern here is that while the proposed regulations include a fairly detailed (and likely lengthy) petition process to challenge regulatory response decisions, they apparently do not include a similar ready process to seek removal of a chemical or product from the priority lists.  Thus, manufacturers and relevant trade associations will have to closely monitor the draft/proposed lists and jump into the comment period before the lists are finalized. Food, drugs, and a few other products are exempt, but the potential list of "consumer products" is quite large.

In the second phase involving Alternative Assessments, product makers will have to provide what may become a quite complex and expensive assessment of potential alternatives to the chemical/product, including a look at hazards, potential exposures, and life cycle.  For example, if the lead of the assessment team works for the manufacturer, the Assessment must be reviewed and verified by an independent third-party consultant.  It is unclear what data DTSC will want to see here, including whether the agency will require additional, new toxicity testing of a product or an alternative.  This may be especially onerous for smaller companies, and for newer technologies (think nano?) in which the existing body of data may not be as robust. One area for companies to watch here is the protection, or lack thereof, of trade secret information.  Ingredients in a product, and possible alternatives that make the product safer, are often a key part of intellectual property, a competitive advantage.  The regulations purport to offer some trade secret protection, but it s not crystal clear how the DTSC will apply this principle.

After receiving the Alternative Assessment, the DTSC is to decide on the best method, if any, to mitigate paternal risks with the product, ranging from no further action to recalls and bans.

The regulations offer a good reminder to double-check company knowledge and comfort with the supply chain, components and agreements, risk sharing provisions, insurance coverage, etc.

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