Lone Pine Ruling Affirmed in Vioxx

The Sergeant Joe Friday character on Dragnet was created and played by actor Jack Webb.  Like so many famous lines, the immortal words, "Just the facts, ma'am," were apparently never uttered by the character.  What Friday actually said in early episodes is "All we want are the facts, ma'am."  

Either way, that's our motto when we post about litigation the firm has been involved in.  But with that limitation, a noteworthy decision is In re Vioxx Products Liab. Litig., 2010 WL 2802352 (5th Cir. July 16, 2010).

After a tentative settlement was reached in the Vioxx litigation, the MDL court entered several pre-trial orders with respect to the claims of those plaintiffs who could not or chose not to participate in the Master Settlement Agreement (MSA).  PTO 28 required non-settling plaintiffs to notify their healthcare providers that they must preserve evidence pertaining to the plaintiffs' use of Vioxx. Plaintiffs were also required to produce pharmacy records and medical authorizations, answers to interrogatories, and a Rule 26(a)(2) report from a medical expert attesting that the plaintiff sustained an injury caused by Vioxx and that the injury occurred within a specified time period. Failure to comply could result in dismissal of the plaintiffs' claims with prejudice.

PTO 28 is characterized as a Lone Pine order, named for Lore v. Lone Pine Corp., No. L-33606-85, 1986 WL 637507 (N.J.Super. Ct. Law Div. Nov. 18, 1986). Lone Pine orders are designed to handle the complex issues and potential burdens on the aprties and the court in mass tort litigation. Acuna v. Brown & Root Inc., 200 F.3d 335, 340 (5th Cir.2000).

The trial court extended deadlines, but eventually defendant Merck moved for an Order to Show Cause as to sixty-one plaintiffs for alleged failure to provide a case-specific expert report as required by PTO 28. The plaintiffs filed responses, arguing that they were in substantial compliance with PTO 28 and that state substantive law only required general forms of causation proof. In April 2009, the district court dismissed these plaintiffs' complaints with prejudice for failure to comply with PTO 28.

A district court's adoption of a Lone Pine order and decision to dismiss a case for failing to comply with a Lone Pine order are reviewed for abuse of discretion. Acuna, 200 F.3d at 340-41. The district court stated that “it is not too much to ask a plaintiff to provide some kind of evidence to support their claim that Vioxx caused them personal injury.”

The court of appeals had previously held that such orders are issued under the wide discretion afforded district judges over the management of discovery under Federal Rule 16. The court had held that the Lone Pine orders essentially required information which plaintiffs should have had before filing their claims pursuant to Rule 11.  Each plaintiff should have at least some information regarding the nature of his injuries, the circumstances under which he could have been exposed to harmful substances, and the basis for believing that the named defendants were responsible for his injuries.

The Fifth Circuit reaffirmed its view that it is within a trial court's discretion to take steps to manage the complex and potentially very burdensome discovery that these mass tort cases would require. The court of appeals thus affirmed the judgment of the district court.
 

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