Update on CPSC Database Issues

We have posted before about one of the more controversial aspects of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act, the to-be-created publicly accessible database of product safety information.

The CPSIA mandates that the database be completed by March, 2011. The agency views its task as the creation of a public portal and a publicly accessible, searchable database of consumer product incident reports. Through the public portal, consumers will theoretically be able to report potential product safety hazards to CPSC in ways that are supposed to improve the quality, value, and accuracy of the data collected. Manufacturers will be able to investigate and respond to product hazard reports more quickly, and to share information with both CPSC investigators and with the public through the public database. And consumers are supposed to be able to use the public portal and database to find more information about hazards in order to keep their families safe.

Unless done very carefully, the database will be of little use to the average consumer, but subject to potential mischief in the hands of plaintiff lawyers.

Since last Fall, the CPSC has held various meetings and a two-day public workshop to gather stakeholder input on the new database. A number of affected groups have submitted comments on the implementation of the new product safety database, including the Soap and Detergent Association.  A common theme for the comments is the need for the CPSC to focus on verifying and ensuring the accuracy of safety incident reports submitted to the commission. Factual accuracy and veracity are two fundamental elements underpinning a credible incident database. 

CPSC needs to develop a process for addressing false and inaccurate reports that will scare consumers, harm business, and generate no additional safety gains. The commission needs to employ means to prevent the submission of fraudulent reports of harm while not discouraging the submission of valid reports.  CPSC also needs to think about specific disclaimers it should make with regard to the accuracy of the information contained in the public database, and not put the governmental imprimatur on voluntary data that has not been verified.  A sufficient time period should also be allocated for manufacturers to evaluate and respond to any proposed report.    

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