Medical Monitoring Decision Set For Interlocutory Appeal

Readers of MassTortDefense interested in the issues surrounding medical monitoring will want to keep their eyes on Hess v. A.I. DuPont Hosp. For Children, 2009 WL 2776606 (E.D.Pa., August 28, 2009).  The court recently granted Defendants' Petition for Certification of Immediate Appeal (to the Third Circuit).

Doctors at the A.I. duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, Delaware, implanted a Cheatham Platinum stent (“CP stent”) in plaintiffs, who alleged that they had been injured or were at risk of injury from the use of the CP stent. After discovery, the trial court granted summary judgment to defendants on a number of the claims, but summary judgment was denied on Count VI, the medical monitoring claim. The trial court predicted that the Delaware Supreme Court would recognize a medical monitoring cause of action if presented with the facts of these cases.

The trial court recognized that there are substantial grounds for disagreement over whether Delaware will actually recognize a cause of action for medical monitoring. While Delaware courts, including the Delaware Supreme Court, have had medical monitoring claims before them on several occasions and have not totally disavowed medical monitoring as a legally cognizable cause of action, neither have they formally recognized the tort as a legally cognizable cause of action.  (In some jurisdictions it is a remedy, not a cause of action.)

Even if the Delaware Supreme Court were to recognize a medical monitoring tort, there are substantial grounds for disagreement over whether plaintiffs here could state a claim. Plaintiffs' theory that medical devices can be the basis for a medical monitoring claim is novel, at best  (and has been rejected in many states: Drugs and devices do not present the same policy issues as involuntary exposure to environmental toxins).   Indeed, there appear to be no cases precisely like this one in which a plaintiff has alleged and a court has recognized a medical monitoring claim where the plaintiff has had a Class III medical device implanted that did not have FDA premarket approval and where the plaintiff did not offer evidence that the device was defective. The court was satisfied that plaintiff's novel theory here is one in which certification of an interlocutory order for appeal is appropriate.

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