White Paper Explains Detrimental Impact of Proposed Medical Device Anti-Preemption Bill

Much of the debate over the preemption doctrine, certainly in the media and even in many legal circles, has focused on the alleged inadequacy of the FDA to regulate drugs and devices, and the purported consequent  need to have state juries of lay people “police” the health industry. Comparatively little attention has been given to the other impacts of eliminating federal preemption.

A new white paper demonstrates that erasing this doctrine would decrease access to life-enhancing medical devices, increase health care costs, and reduce medical device industry employment. Congressional Democrats are seeking to do just this in the device context -- the Medical Device Safety Act of 2009 was crafted in response to the U.S. Supreme Court's 8-1 ruling in February, 2008 in Riegel v. Medtronic, upholding preemption for certain medical devices when the devices, and their warning labels, had been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.


The Economic Impact of Eliminating Federal Preemption for Medical Devices on Patients, Innovation and Jobs” was authored by Ernst Berndt, professor in applied economics at MIT's Sloan School of Management, and Mark Trusheim. They argue that among the effects of the bill would be:

 • Reduced patient access to products and the health benefits they provide

• Unreliable, variable patient access to products and the health benefits they provide as varying state regulations and tort liabilities discourage or eliminate products in some regions but not others

• Increased medical costs and lower net public health compared to what could be achieved with increased medical device innovation and product introductions

• Increased defensive medical practices by physicians to avoid possible litigation, raising health costs and exposing patients to greater risks from the added unnecessary procedures

• Reduction in the number of products being developed as manufacturers and their investors respond to greater uncertainty regarding product approval and economic sustainability

• Transfer of health regulatory decisions to untrained, non-expert juries who are exposed to only a biased fraction of the scientific fact base on which to base their decisions


The authors compare the bill to what happened with vaccines: from 1967 to 2004 the number of vaccine makers plummeted from 26 to 3, leading to reduced access, higher costs, no new products, shortages of existing products, a fragile vaccine supply chain, reduced employment and increases in preventable illness. Congress had to step in and take the vaccines out of the traditional tort system.

Under the bill, the authors note, state juries would be asked to render decisions regarding device safety and efficacy based on a limited range of information focused on individual risk versus broad benefit at a trial typically lasting at most several weeks. Allowing state tort suits to do this will place state juries in the position of replacing, by overriding, professionally trained federal regulators in evaluating and quantifying the risks of medical devices. And unlike federal regulators, state juries will not balance, perhaps not even consider, the benefits to those for whom the medical devices enhances health and quality of life -- who of course are not parties to the action.
 

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