Update on Proposed Amendment to Federal Rules on Expert Discovery

Experts play a vital role in mass tort defense.  Selection, preparation, and discovery of experts are crucial pre-trial tasks of the defense attorney.  Thus, the rules of civil procedure governing those tasks really matter.

The end of the time period for public comment on proposed changes to Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 26 is rapidly approaching. The formal process to amend the rule governing expert discovery began in early 2008 when the Advisory Committee on civil rules met to consider rule changes recommended by the American Bar Association. After drafting a proposed rule, the committee published the changes for public comment. Written comments are due by February 17, 2009.  There will be a final public Judicial Conference hearing in San Francisco, California, on February 2, 2009.  Guidelines for submitting comments can be found here.


After the comment period ends in February, the advisory committee is expected to consider comments and, if needed, redraft the rule.  Under the Rules Enabling Act, the rule will then be forwarded to the Standing Committee on Rules of Practice and Procedure, which must consider the changes. The standing committee would review the rule at a meeting planned for June, and submit it to the Judicial Conference for consideration at its September session. The proposed changes could go to the U.S. Supreme Court in time for the October session. Assuming this timeline holds up, the Supreme Court must act on the changes by May, 2010. The final step will require consideration by Congress, which will have seven months to act on the proposal. By statute, non-action would allow the rule changes to take effect early as December, 2010.

But the first deadline is the looming end to the public comment period.

What would the rule do?

The key changes extend work-product protection to drafts of Rule 26(a)(2)(B) expert reports and 26(a)(2)(C) party disclosures, and also to certain attorney-expert communications. The proposed amendments are designed to reflect what the Standing Committee calls the “lessons of experience” as opposed to theory, and to provide useful discovery while reducing practices that now impede the best use of expert trial witnesses.

Under the proposal, Rule 26(b)(4) would be amended to extend work-product protection to drafts of expert reports, drafts of party disclosures, and communications between expert witnesses and counsel. Exceptions are carved out for discovery of compensation, identification of facts or data the attorney provided to the expert and that the expert considered in forming the opinions to be expressed; and any assumptions that the attorney provided to the expert and that the expert relied upon in forming opinions.

Some courts have interpreted the Advisory Committee note on existing Rule 26(a)(2)(B) to allow parties to inquire into all communications between experts and counsel, multiplying expenses with little benefit to the parties, and impeding the way cases are actually prepared for trial. This approach has also contributed to the practice of retaining two experts, one to testify and the other to consult. Many lawyers will stipulate out of discovery of draft reports and attorney-expert communication because the costs of such discovery seem higher than the infrequent, small benefits that may be gained. The changes thus are needed to create efficiencies and to reduce litigation costs.

Some academics and the plaintiffs’ bar argue, however, that any restriction on inquiry into the expert's relationship with retaining counsel is a bad idea. Some have even started a letter-writing campaign opposing the proposed amendments. Comments from DRI, on the other hand, suggest that the protections should extend to communications between attorneys and the expert's staff as well.
 

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